The cysteine-rich region and secreted form of the attachment G glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus enhance the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response despite lacking major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted epitopes

Alexander Bukreyev, Maria Elina Serra, Federico R. Laham, Guillermina A. Melendi, Steven R. Kleeberger, Peter L. Collins, Fernando P. Polack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response is important for the control of viral replication during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The attachment glycoprotein (G) of RSV does not encode major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted epitopes in BALB/c mice (H-2d). Furthermore, studies to date have described an absence of significant CTL activity directed against this protein in humans. Therefore, G previously was not considered necessary for the generation of RSV-specific CTL responses. In this study, we demonstrate that, despite lacking H-2d-restricted epitopes, G enhances the generation of an effective CTL response against RSV. Furthermore, we show that this stimulatory effect is independent of virus titers and RSV-induced inflammation; that it is associated primarily with the secreted form of G; and that the effect depends on the cysteine-rich region of G (GCRR), a segment conserved in wild-type isolates worldwide. These findings reveal a novel function for the GCRR with potential implications for the generation of protective cellular responses and vaccine development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5854-5861
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume80
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

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cytotoxic T-lymphocytes
major histocompatibility complex
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Major Histocompatibility Complex
epitopes
Cysteine
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
cysteine
glycoproteins
Epitopes
viruses
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Viral Load
vaccine development
virus replication
viral load
Vaccines
Inflammation
inflammation
Respiratory syncytial virus G glycoprotein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

The cysteine-rich region and secreted form of the attachment G glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus enhance the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response despite lacking major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted epitopes. / Bukreyev, Alexander; Serra, Maria Elina; Laham, Federico R.; Melendi, Guillermina A.; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Collins, Peter L.; Polack, Fernando P.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 80, No. 12, 06.2006, p. 5854-5861.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bukreyev, Alexander ; Serra, Maria Elina ; Laham, Federico R. ; Melendi, Guillermina A. ; Kleeberger, Steven R. ; Collins, Peter L. ; Polack, Fernando P. / The cysteine-rich region and secreted form of the attachment G glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus enhance the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response despite lacking major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted epitopes. In: Journal of Virology. 2006 ; Vol. 80, No. 12. pp. 5854-5861.
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