The effect of adult children living in the United States on the likelihood of cognitive impairment for older parents living in Mexico

Brian Downer, Cesar González-González, Noreen Goldman, Anne R. Pebley, Rebeca Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The increased risk for poor physical and mental health outcomes for older parents in Mexico who have an adult child living in the United States may contribute to an increased risk for cognitive impairment in this population. The objective of this study was to examine if older adults in Mexico who have one or more adult children living in the United States are more or less likely to develop cognitive impairment over an 11-year period compared to older adults who do not have any adult children living in the United States. Design: Data for this study came from Wave I (2001) and Wave III (2012) of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. The final sample included 2609 participants aged 60 and over who were not cognitively impaired in 2001 and had one or more adult children (age ≥15). Participants were matched using a propensity score that was estimated with a multivariable logistic regression model that included sociodemographic characteristics and migration history of the older parents. Results: Having one or more adult children living in the United States is associated with lower socioeconomic status and higher number of depressive symptoms, but greater social engagement for older parents living in Mexico. No significant differences in the odds for developing cognitive impairment according to having one or more adult children living in the United States were detected. Conclusion: In summary, having one or more adult children living in the United States was associated with characteristics that may increase and decrease the risk for cognitive impairment. This may contribute to the non-significant relationship between migration status of adult children and likelihood for cognitive impairment for older parents living in Mexico.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 26 2016

Fingerprint

Adult Children
Mexico
parents
Parents
Logistic Models
Propensity Score
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognitive Impairment
migration
Social Class
Mental Health
Depression
social status
logistics
mental health
Health
regression
Population

Keywords

  • aging
  • Cognition
  • human migration
  • Mexico

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The effect of adult children living in the United States on the likelihood of cognitive impairment for older parents living in Mexico. / Downer, Brian; González-González, Cesar; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R.; Wong, Rebeca.

In: Ethnicity and Health, 26.10.2016, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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