The effect of denervation on soft-tissue infection pathophysiology

W. E. Alison, Linda Phillips, H. A. Linares, P. S. Hui, P. G. Hayward, L. D. Broemeling, J. P. Heggers, M. C. Robson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Pressure is the sine qua non in the etiology of pressure sores; however, ischemia, denervation, edema, and infection also have been implicated. The role of denervation in tissue infection was studied in an isolated in vivo ovine flap model. Twenty-six adult ewes, divided into three groups, had 29 island pedicle flaps raised on their buttocks. In group I, the cutaneous nerve remained intact, while group II had its nerve divided acutely. Group III had prolonged denervation, where the nerve was divided 7 days before flap elevation. All flaps received intradermal inoculations of 107 Staphylococcus aureus. Ninety-six hours later, quantitative bacteriology showed counts of 107, 107, and 109 colony-forming units (CFU) per gram of tissue in groups I, II, and III, respectively. Septic foci were larger in group III, and there was a significant increase in tissue edema between groups I and III. A 25- fold increase in bacterial counts seen in the prolonged denervation group may help explain why neurologically injured patients are more susceptible to infection and pressure ulcerations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1031-1035
Number of pages5
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume90
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Soft Tissue Infections
Denervation
Edema
Infection
Pressure
Surgical Flaps
Buttocks
Bacteriology
Bacterial Load
Pressure Ulcer
Staphylococcus aureus
Sheep
Stem Cells
Ischemia
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Alison, W. E., Phillips, L., Linares, H. A., Hui, P. S., Hayward, P. G., Broemeling, L. D., ... Robson, M. C. (1992). The effect of denervation on soft-tissue infection pathophysiology. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 90(6), 1031-1035.

The effect of denervation on soft-tissue infection pathophysiology. / Alison, W. E.; Phillips, Linda; Linares, H. A.; Hui, P. S.; Hayward, P. G.; Broemeling, L. D.; Heggers, J. P.; Robson, M. C.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 90, No. 6, 1992, p. 1031-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alison, WE, Phillips, L, Linares, HA, Hui, PS, Hayward, PG, Broemeling, LD, Heggers, JP & Robson, MC 1992, 'The effect of denervation on soft-tissue infection pathophysiology', Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 90, no. 6, pp. 1031-1035.
Alison WE, Phillips L, Linares HA, Hui PS, Hayward PG, Broemeling LD et al. The effect of denervation on soft-tissue infection pathophysiology. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 1992;90(6):1031-1035.
Alison, W. E. ; Phillips, Linda ; Linares, H. A. ; Hui, P. S. ; Hayward, P. G. ; Broemeling, L. D. ; Heggers, J. P. ; Robson, M. C. / The effect of denervation on soft-tissue infection pathophysiology. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 1992 ; Vol. 90, No. 6. pp. 1031-1035.
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