The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading

Susan H. Landry, Karen E. Smith, Paul R. Swank, Tricia Zucker, April D. Crawford, Emily F. Solari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined mother-child shared book reading behaviors before and after participation in a random-assignment responsive parenting intervention called Play and Learning Strategies (PALS) that occurred during infancy (PALS I), the toddler-preschool (PALS II) period, or both as compared with a developmental assessment (DAS) intervention (DAS Iand/or II). The efficacy of PALS was previously demonstrated for improving mother and child behaviors within play contexts, everyday activities, and standardized measures of child language. We hypothesized that PALS effects would generalize to influence maternal andchild behaviors during a shared reading task even though this situation was not a specificfocus of the intervention and that this would be similar for children who varied in biological risk. Participation in at least PALS II was expected to have a positive effect due to children's increased capacity to engage in book reading at this age. Four groups of randomized mothers and their children (PALS I-II, PALS I-DAS II, DAS I-PALS II, DAS I-II) were observed in shared reading interactions during the toddler-preschool period and codedfor (a) mother's affective and cognitive-linguistic supports and (b) child's responses tomaternal requests and initiations. Support was found for significant changes in observed maternal and child behaviors, and evidence of mediation was found for the intervention toaffect children's behaviors through change in maternal responsiveness behaviors. These results add to other studies supporting the importance of targeting a broad range of responsive behaviors across theoretical frameworks in interventions to facilitate children's development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)969-986
Number of pages18
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Parenting
learning strategy
Reading
parents
Learning
interaction
Maternal Behavior
Child Behavior
Mothers
Child Language
reading behavior
participation
Linguistics
Child Development
mediation
linguistics

Keywords

  • Affective responsive parenting
  • Biological risks
  • Cognitively responsive
  • Early intervention
  • Shared book reading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography

Cite this

Landry, S. H., Smith, K. E., Swank, P. R., Zucker, T., Crawford, A. D., & Solari, E. F. (2012). The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading. Developmental Psychology, 48(4), 969-986. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0026400

The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading. / Landry, Susan H.; Smith, Karen E.; Swank, Paul R.; Zucker, Tricia; Crawford, April D.; Solari, Emily F.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 48, No. 4, 07.2012, p. 969-986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landry, SH, Smith, KE, Swank, PR, Zucker, T, Crawford, AD & Solari, EF 2012, 'The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading', Developmental Psychology, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 969-986. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0026400
Landry, Susan H. ; Smith, Karen E. ; Swank, Paul R. ; Zucker, Tricia ; Crawford, April D. ; Solari, Emily F. / The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading. In: Developmental Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 48, No. 4. pp. 969-986.
@article{1a62b02d12ae4e74b5d9640e1530222e,
title = "The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading",
abstract = "This study examined mother-child shared book reading behaviors before and after participation in a random-assignment responsive parenting intervention called Play and Learning Strategies (PALS) that occurred during infancy (PALS I), the toddler-preschool (PALS II) period, or both as compared with a developmental assessment (DAS) intervention (DAS Iand/or II). The efficacy of PALS was previously demonstrated for improving mother and child behaviors within play contexts, everyday activities, and standardized measures of child language. We hypothesized that PALS effects would generalize to influence maternal andchild behaviors during a shared reading task even though this situation was not a specificfocus of the intervention and that this would be similar for children who varied in biological risk. Participation in at least PALS II was expected to have a positive effect due to children's increased capacity to engage in book reading at this age. Four groups of randomized mothers and their children (PALS I-II, PALS I-DAS II, DAS I-PALS II, DAS I-II) were observed in shared reading interactions during the toddler-preschool period and codedfor (a) mother's affective and cognitive-linguistic supports and (b) child's responses tomaternal requests and initiations. Support was found for significant changes in observed maternal and child behaviors, and evidence of mediation was found for the intervention toaffect children's behaviors through change in maternal responsiveness behaviors. These results add to other studies supporting the importance of targeting a broad range of responsive behaviors across theoretical frameworks in interventions to facilitate children's development.",
keywords = "Affective responsive parenting, Biological risks, Cognitively responsive, Early intervention, Shared book reading",
author = "Landry, {Susan H.} and Smith, {Karen E.} and Swank, {Paul R.} and Tricia Zucker and Crawford, {April D.} and Solari, {Emily F.}",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1037/a0026400",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "969--986",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of a responsive parenting intervention on parent-child interactions during shared book reading

AU - Landry, Susan H.

AU - Smith, Karen E.

AU - Swank, Paul R.

AU - Zucker, Tricia

AU - Crawford, April D.

AU - Solari, Emily F.

PY - 2012/7

Y1 - 2012/7

N2 - This study examined mother-child shared book reading behaviors before and after participation in a random-assignment responsive parenting intervention called Play and Learning Strategies (PALS) that occurred during infancy (PALS I), the toddler-preschool (PALS II) period, or both as compared with a developmental assessment (DAS) intervention (DAS Iand/or II). The efficacy of PALS was previously demonstrated for improving mother and child behaviors within play contexts, everyday activities, and standardized measures of child language. We hypothesized that PALS effects would generalize to influence maternal andchild behaviors during a shared reading task even though this situation was not a specificfocus of the intervention and that this would be similar for children who varied in biological risk. Participation in at least PALS II was expected to have a positive effect due to children's increased capacity to engage in book reading at this age. Four groups of randomized mothers and their children (PALS I-II, PALS I-DAS II, DAS I-PALS II, DAS I-II) were observed in shared reading interactions during the toddler-preschool period and codedfor (a) mother's affective and cognitive-linguistic supports and (b) child's responses tomaternal requests and initiations. Support was found for significant changes in observed maternal and child behaviors, and evidence of mediation was found for the intervention toaffect children's behaviors through change in maternal responsiveness behaviors. These results add to other studies supporting the importance of targeting a broad range of responsive behaviors across theoretical frameworks in interventions to facilitate children's development.

AB - This study examined mother-child shared book reading behaviors before and after participation in a random-assignment responsive parenting intervention called Play and Learning Strategies (PALS) that occurred during infancy (PALS I), the toddler-preschool (PALS II) period, or both as compared with a developmental assessment (DAS) intervention (DAS Iand/or II). The efficacy of PALS was previously demonstrated for improving mother and child behaviors within play contexts, everyday activities, and standardized measures of child language. We hypothesized that PALS effects would generalize to influence maternal andchild behaviors during a shared reading task even though this situation was not a specificfocus of the intervention and that this would be similar for children who varied in biological risk. Participation in at least PALS II was expected to have a positive effect due to children's increased capacity to engage in book reading at this age. Four groups of randomized mothers and their children (PALS I-II, PALS I-DAS II, DAS I-PALS II, DAS I-II) were observed in shared reading interactions during the toddler-preschool period and codedfor (a) mother's affective and cognitive-linguistic supports and (b) child's responses tomaternal requests and initiations. Support was found for significant changes in observed maternal and child behaviors, and evidence of mediation was found for the intervention toaffect children's behaviors through change in maternal responsiveness behaviors. These results add to other studies supporting the importance of targeting a broad range of responsive behaviors across theoretical frameworks in interventions to facilitate children's development.

KW - Affective responsive parenting

KW - Biological risks

KW - Cognitively responsive

KW - Early intervention

KW - Shared book reading

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868098429&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868098429&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0026400

DO - 10.1037/a0026400

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 969

EP - 986

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 4

ER -