The epidemiology of infectious diseases of livestock.

F. A. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

From the time of the first modern studies of infectious diseases, by Koch, Pasteur, Theiler and their colleagues, it has been clear that laboratory investigation must be complemented by epidemiologic investigation. The measurement of all aspects of the natural history of a disease in naturally affected populations is necessary if we are to rationally design control regimens. Building upon a historic perspective, this paper presents a view of the present status of epidemiology as it pertains to animal disease control, and presents a view of the merits of expanding the use of this science in future animal disease control programs, internationally, in developed and developing countries. The basis for this view lies in adaptation of principles employed in human infectious disease epidemiology, and principles which guide the organization of international disease control agencies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-200
Number of pages6
JournalThe Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research
Volume52
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1985

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Animal Diseases
animal diseases
Livestock
infectious diseases
Communicable Diseases
epidemiology
disease control
Epidemiology
livestock
disease control programs
historic sites
international organizations
Developed Countries
developed countries
Developing Countries
developing countries
Organizations
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

The epidemiology of infectious diseases of livestock. / Murphy, F. A.

In: The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research, Vol. 52, No. 3, 09.1985, p. 195-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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