The Glutamate System as a Crucial Regulator of CNS Toxicity and Survival of HIV Reservoirs

Anna Maria Gorska, Eliseo A. Eugenin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Glutamate (Glu) is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). HIV-1 and viral proteins compromise glutamate synaptic transmission, resulting in poor cell-to-cell signaling and bystander toxicity. In this study, we identified that myeloid HIV-1-brain reservoirs survive in Glu and glutamine (Gln) as a major source of energy. Thus, we found a link between synaptic compromise, metabolomics of viral reservoirs, and viral persistence. In the current manuscript we will discuss all these interactions and the potential to achieve eradication and cure using this unique metabolic profile.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number261
JournalFrontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 24 2020

Keywords

  • HIV
  • NeuroHIV
  • cure
  • dementia
  • glutamate
  • glutamine
  • reservoirs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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