The horizontal sacrum as an indicator of the tethered spinal cord in spina bifida aperta and occulta.

R. Shane Tubbs, Cuong J. Bui, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali Mohajel Shoja, W. Jerry Oakes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECT: The authors report on symptomatic patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) and lipomyelomeningocele (LMMC) who were found to have changes in their lumbosacral angle (LSA) corresponding to the onset of symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord. METHODS: The authors review data obtained in these two cohorts of patients and compare the LSAs measured in the perinatal period with those seen when the patients presented with symptoms of a tethered spinal cord. RESULTS: Children with LMMC, roughly one third of studied cases, were symptomatic due to a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. In children in whom the MMC was the closed form at birth, 20 of 30 had symptoms that could be indicative of a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. The LSA was altered in both groups with symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Signs and symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord appear to correspond to increases in the LSA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalNeurosurgical focus
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Spina Bifida Cystica
Spina Bifida Occulta
Sacrum
Spinal Cord
Meningomyelocele
Signs and Symptoms
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The horizontal sacrum as an indicator of the tethered spinal cord in spina bifida aperta and occulta. / Tubbs, R. Shane; Bui, Cuong J.; Loukas, Marios; Mohajel Shoja, Mohammadali; Oakes, W. Jerry.

In: Neurosurgical focus, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.01.2007, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tubbs, R. Shane ; Bui, Cuong J. ; Loukas, Marios ; Mohajel Shoja, Mohammadali ; Oakes, W. Jerry. / The horizontal sacrum as an indicator of the tethered spinal cord in spina bifida aperta and occulta. In: Neurosurgical focus. 2007 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 1-4.
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abstract = "OBJECT: The authors report on symptomatic patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) and lipomyelomeningocele (LMMC) who were found to have changes in their lumbosacral angle (LSA) corresponding to the onset of symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord. METHODS: The authors review data obtained in these two cohorts of patients and compare the LSAs measured in the perinatal period with those seen when the patients presented with symptoms of a tethered spinal cord. RESULTS: Children with LMMC, roughly one third of studied cases, were symptomatic due to a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. In children in whom the MMC was the closed form at birth, 20 of 30 had symptoms that could be indicative of a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. The LSA was altered in both groups with symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Signs and symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord appear to correspond to increases in the LSA.",
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AU - Mohajel Shoja, Mohammadali

AU - Oakes, W. Jerry

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N2 - OBJECT: The authors report on symptomatic patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) and lipomyelomeningocele (LMMC) who were found to have changes in their lumbosacral angle (LSA) corresponding to the onset of symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord. METHODS: The authors review data obtained in these two cohorts of patients and compare the LSAs measured in the perinatal period with those seen when the patients presented with symptoms of a tethered spinal cord. RESULTS: Children with LMMC, roughly one third of studied cases, were symptomatic due to a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. In children in whom the MMC was the closed form at birth, 20 of 30 had symptoms that could be indicative of a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. The LSA was altered in both groups with symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Signs and symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord appear to correspond to increases in the LSA.

AB - OBJECT: The authors report on symptomatic patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) and lipomyelomeningocele (LMMC) who were found to have changes in their lumbosacral angle (LSA) corresponding to the onset of symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord. METHODS: The authors review data obtained in these two cohorts of patients and compare the LSAs measured in the perinatal period with those seen when the patients presented with symptoms of a tethered spinal cord. RESULTS: Children with LMMC, roughly one third of studied cases, were symptomatic due to a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. In children in whom the MMC was the closed form at birth, 20 of 30 had symptoms that could be indicative of a tethered spinal cord at their most recent follow-up. The LSA was altered in both groups with symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Signs and symptoms indicative of a tethered spinal cord appear to correspond to increases in the LSA.

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