The horizontally-acquired response regulator SsrB drives a Salmonella lifestyle switch by relieving biofilm silencing

Stuti K. Desai, Ricksen S. Winardhi, Saravanan Periasamy, Michal M. Dykas, Yan Jie, Linda Kenney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

A common strategy by which bacterial pathogens reside in humans is by shifting from a virulent lifestyle, (systemic infection), to a dormant carrier state. Two major serovars of Salmonella enterica, Typhi and Typhimurium, have evolved a two-component regulatory system to exist inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles in the macrophage, as well as to persist as asymptomatic biofilms in the gallbladder. Here we present evidence that SsrB, a transcriptional regulator encoded on the SPI-2 pathogenicity-island, determines the switch between these two lifestyles by controlling ancestral and horizontally-acquired genes. In the acidic macrophage vacuole, the kinase SsrA phosphorylates SsrB, and SsrB~P relieves silencing of virulence genes and activates their transcription. In the absence of SsrA, unphosphorylated SsrB directs transcription of factors required for biofilm formation specifically by activating csgD (agfD), the master biofilm regulator by disrupting the silenced, H-NS-bound promoter. Anti-silencing mechanisms thus control the switch between opposing lifestyles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere10747
JournaleLife
Volume5
Issue numberFEBRUARY2016
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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