The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment - Workshop of the National Research Council's Board on Radiation Effects Research

R. J M Fry, A. Grosovsky, P. C. Hanawalt, R. F. Jostes, J. B. Little, W. F. Morgan, N. L. Oleinick, R. L. Ullrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The linear no-threshold extrapolation from a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation derived at higher doses to doses for which regulatory standards are proposed is being challenged by some scientists and defended by others. It appears that the risks associated with exposures to doses of interest are below the risks that can be measured with epidemiological studies. Therefore, many have looked to biology to provide information relevant to risk assessment. The workshop reported here, 'The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment', was planned to address the need for additional information by bringing together scientists who have been working in key fields of biology and others who have been contemplating the issues associated specifically with this question. The goals of the workshop were to summarize and review the status of the relevant biology, to determine how the reported biological data might influence risk assessment, and to identify subjects on which more data are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-705
Number of pages11
JournalRadiation Research
Volume150
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1998

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risk assessment
Radiation Effects
radiation effects
biology
Education
Biological Sciences
dosage
Research
Ionizing Radiation
ionizing radiation
epidemiological studies
dose response
extrapolation
Epidemiologic Studies
thresholds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Biophysics
  • Radiation

Cite this

Fry, R. J. M., Grosovsky, A., Hanawalt, P. C., Jostes, R. F., Little, J. B., Morgan, W. F., ... Ullrich, R. L. (1998). The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment - Workshop of the National Research Council's Board on Radiation Effects Research. Radiation Research, 150(6), 695-705.

The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment - Workshop of the National Research Council's Board on Radiation Effects Research. / Fry, R. J M; Grosovsky, A.; Hanawalt, P. C.; Jostes, R. F.; Little, J. B.; Morgan, W. F.; Oleinick, N. L.; Ullrich, R. L.

In: Radiation Research, Vol. 150, No. 6, 12.1998, p. 695-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fry, RJM, Grosovsky, A, Hanawalt, PC, Jostes, RF, Little, JB, Morgan, WF, Oleinick, NL & Ullrich, RL 1998, 'The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment - Workshop of the National Research Council's Board on Radiation Effects Research', Radiation Research, vol. 150, no. 6, pp. 695-705.
Fry RJM, Grosovsky A, Hanawalt PC, Jostes RF, Little JB, Morgan WF et al. The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment - Workshop of the National Research Council's Board on Radiation Effects Research. Radiation Research. 1998 Dec;150(6):695-705.
Fry, R. J M ; Grosovsky, A. ; Hanawalt, P. C. ; Jostes, R. F. ; Little, J. B. ; Morgan, W. F. ; Oleinick, N. L. ; Ullrich, R. L. / The Impact of Biology on Risk Assessment - Workshop of the National Research Council's Board on Radiation Effects Research. In: Radiation Research. 1998 ; Vol. 150, No. 6. pp. 695-705.
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