The intriguing history of the human calvaria: Sinister and religious

R. Shane Tubbs, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali Mohajel Shoja, Nihal Apaydin, E. George Salter, W. Jerry Oakes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: A review of the ancient world finds multiple documentations describing the use of the human calvaria as a drinking implement. Terminology: This term, which is frequently and incorrectly called the "calvarium," has a unique history among multiple cultures of the world. For example, the purported site of Jesus' crucifixion "Calvary" is derived from this term calvaria. The present report explores the derivation, misuse, and history of the human calvaria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-422
Number of pages6
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Anatomy
  • Cranium
  • Historical
  • Skull
  • Skull cap

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Tubbs, R. S., Loukas, M., Mohajel Shoja, M., Apaydin, N., Salter, E. G., & Oakes, W. J. (2008). The intriguing history of the human calvaria: Sinister and religious. Child's Nervous System, 24(4), 417-422. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00381-007-0509-0