The long lifespan of two bat species is correlated with resistance to protein oxidation and enhanced protein homeostasis

Adam B. Salmon, Shanique Leonard, Venkata Masamsetti, Anson Pierce, Andrej J. Podlutsky, Natalia Podlutskaya, Arlan Richardson, Steven N. Austad, Asish R. Chaudhuri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Altered structure, and hence function, of cellular macromolecules caused by oxidation can contribute to loss of physiological function with age. Here, we tested whether the lifespan of bats, which generally live far longer than predicted by their size, could be explained by reduced protein damage relative to short-lived mice. We show significantly lower protein oxidation (carbonylation) in Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) relative to mice, and a trend for lower oxidation in samples from cave myotis bats (Myotis velifer) relative to mice. Both species of bat show in vivo and in vitro resistance to protein oxidation under conditions of acute oxidative stress. These bat species also show low levels of protein ubiquitination in total protein lysates along with reduced proteasome activity, suggesting diminished protein damage and removal in bats. Lastly, we show that bat-derived protein fractions are resistant to urea-induced protein unfolding relative to the level of unfolding detected in fractions from mice. Together, these data suggest that long lifespan in some bat species might be regulated by very efficient maintenance of protein homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2317-2326
Number of pages10
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Homeostasis
Oxidation
Proteins
Protein Carbonylation
Protein Unfolding
Carbonylation
Ubiquitination
Caves
Oxidative stress
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Macromolecules
Urea
Oxidative Stress
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Chiroptera
  • Comparative biology
  • Longevity
  • Oxidative stress
  • Ubiquitin-proteasome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biotechnology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Salmon, A. B., Leonard, S., Masamsetti, V., Pierce, A., Podlutsky, A. J., Podlutskaya, N., ... Chaudhuri, A. R. (2009). The long lifespan of two bat species is correlated with resistance to protein oxidation and enhanced protein homeostasis. FASEB Journal, 23(7), 2317-2326. https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.08-122523

The long lifespan of two bat species is correlated with resistance to protein oxidation and enhanced protein homeostasis. / Salmon, Adam B.; Leonard, Shanique; Masamsetti, Venkata; Pierce, Anson; Podlutsky, Andrej J.; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Richardson, Arlan; Austad, Steven N.; Chaudhuri, Asish R.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 23, No. 7, 07.2009, p. 2317-2326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salmon, AB, Leonard, S, Masamsetti, V, Pierce, A, Podlutsky, AJ, Podlutskaya, N, Richardson, A, Austad, SN & Chaudhuri, AR 2009, 'The long lifespan of two bat species is correlated with resistance to protein oxidation and enhanced protein homeostasis', FASEB Journal, vol. 23, no. 7, pp. 2317-2326. https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.08-122523
Salmon, Adam B. ; Leonard, Shanique ; Masamsetti, Venkata ; Pierce, Anson ; Podlutsky, Andrej J. ; Podlutskaya, Natalia ; Richardson, Arlan ; Austad, Steven N. ; Chaudhuri, Asish R. / The long lifespan of two bat species is correlated with resistance to protein oxidation and enhanced protein homeostasis. In: FASEB Journal. 2009 ; Vol. 23, No. 7. pp. 2317-2326.
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