The Milestones for Psychosomatic Medicine Subspecialty Training

Robert J. Boland, Madeleine Becker, James L. Levenson, Mark Servis, Catherine C. Crone, Laura Edgar, Christopher Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education Milestones project is a key element in the Next Accreditation System for graduate medical education. On completing the general psychiatry milestones in 2013, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education began the process of creating milestones for the accredited psychiatric subspecialties. Methods: With consultation from the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education appointed a working group to create the psychosomatic medicine milestones, using the general psychiatry milestones as a starting point. Results: This article represents a record of the work of this committee. It describes the history and rationale behind the milestones, the development process used by the working group, and the implications of these milestones on psychosomatic medicine fellowship training. Conclusions: The milestones, as presented in this article, will have an important influence on psychosomatic medicine training programs. The implications of these include changes in how fellowship programs will be reviewed and accredited by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education and changes in the process of assessment and feedback for fellows.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-167
Number of pages15
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Boland, R. J., Becker, M., Levenson, J. L., Servis, M., Crone, C. C., Edgar, L., & Thomas, C. (2015). The Milestones for Psychosomatic Medicine Subspecialty Training. Psychosomatics, 56(2), 153-167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2014.11.003