The opioid epidemic and patient satisfaction

A review of one institution's experience

John Hagedorn, Mitchell Myers, Julie Holihan, Andrew Choo, Timothy Achor, John Munz, Joshua Gary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The opioid crisis caused the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to rescheduled hydrocodone to schedule II from III. Other narcotics (i.e. codeine) were not reclassified, becoming the narcotic medications for many surgeons. We wanted to review how this rescheduling of hydrocodone influenced prescribing practices and Press Ganey scores. Methods: A retrospective review from April 6, 2014 to April 5, 2015 was conducted on all orthopaedic trauma patients at a level I trauma center. Patient charts were abstracted for the type and amount of narcotic prescribed. Press Ganey scores for the surgeons were collected during the same period. The data were used to determine the percentage of hydrocodone prescription before and after reclassification as well as the effect on Press Ganey Scores. Results: Surgeons significantly decreased the percentage of hydrocodone prescriptions, 70% versus 44% (P < 0.001) after reclassification. Two surgeons, A (76% vs. 11%) and B (69% vs. 30%) had a significant decrease in the percentage of hydrocodone (P < 0.0001), surgeon C's percentage (67% vs. 67%) did not change (P =0.96), and surgeon D significantly increased (67% vs. 86%) (P =0.009). No significant changes were seen for overall Press Ganey scores for the group aggregate, or individual providers, 91 versus 91 (P =0.993) after reclassification. Conclusions: The results show that the percentage of hydrocodone to all narcotic prescription decreased after rescheduling hydrocodone. This did vary by individual surgeon, with one surgeon's percentage being significantly increased. Press Ganey scores did not appear to be influenced by rescheduling hydrocodone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Orthopaedic Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hydrocodone
Patient Satisfaction
Opioid Analgesics
Narcotics
Prescriptions
Codeine
Surgeons
Trauma Centers
Orthopedics
Appointments and Schedules

Keywords

  • classification
  • narcotics
  • pain
  • Press Ganey
  • satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The opioid epidemic and patient satisfaction : A review of one institution's experience. / Hagedorn, John; Myers, Mitchell; Holihan, Julie; Choo, Andrew; Achor, Timothy; Munz, John; Gary, Joshua.

In: Current Orthopaedic Practice, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hagedorn, John ; Myers, Mitchell ; Holihan, Julie ; Choo, Andrew ; Achor, Timothy ; Munz, John ; Gary, Joshua. / The opioid epidemic and patient satisfaction : A review of one institution's experience. In: Current Orthopaedic Practice. 2018.
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