The protective effect of neighborhood composition on increasing frailty among older Mexican Americans

A barrio advantage?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Little is known about the nature of the frailty syndrome in older Hispanics who are projected to be the largest minority older population by 2050. The authors examine prospectively the relationship between medical, psychosocial, and neighborhood factors and increasing frailty in a community-dwelling sample of Mexican Americans older than 75 years. Method: Based on a modified version of the Cardiovascular Health Study Frailty Index, the authors examine 2-year follow-up data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE) to ascertain the rates and determinants of increasing frailty among 2,069 Mexican American adults 75+ years of age at baseline. Results: Respondents at risk of increasing frailty live in a less ethnically dense Mexican-American neighborhood, are older, do not have private insurance or Medicare, have higher levels of medical conditions, have lower levels of cognitive functioning, and report less positive affect. Discussion: Personal as well as neighborhood characteristics confer protective effects on individual health in this representative, well-characterized sample of older Mexican Americans. Potential mechanisms that may be implicated in the protective effect of ethnically homogenous communities are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1189-1217
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
health
Independent Living
insurance
community
Health
Medicare
Insurance
minority
determinants
Population
Epidemiologic Studies
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • cognitive
  • disability
  • frailty
  • Mexican Americans
  • neighborhood context
  • positive affect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Community and Home Care

Cite this

@article{a00ae4aeda314d429a89cc6209c7904b,
title = "The protective effect of neighborhood composition on increasing frailty among older Mexican Americans: A barrio advantage?",
abstract = "Objective: Little is known about the nature of the frailty syndrome in older Hispanics who are projected to be the largest minority older population by 2050. The authors examine prospectively the relationship between medical, psychosocial, and neighborhood factors and increasing frailty in a community-dwelling sample of Mexican Americans older than 75 years. Method: Based on a modified version of the Cardiovascular Health Study Frailty Index, the authors examine 2-year follow-up data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE) to ascertain the rates and determinants of increasing frailty among 2,069 Mexican American adults 75+ years of age at baseline. Results: Respondents at risk of increasing frailty live in a less ethnically dense Mexican-American neighborhood, are older, do not have private insurance or Medicare, have higher levels of medical conditions, have lower levels of cognitive functioning, and report less positive affect. Discussion: Personal as well as neighborhood characteristics confer protective effects on individual health in this representative, well-characterized sample of older Mexican Americans. Potential mechanisms that may be implicated in the protective effect of ethnically homogenous communities are discussed.",
keywords = "cognitive, disability, frailty, Mexican Americans, neighborhood context, positive affect",
author = "Aranda, {Mar{\'i}a P.} and Ray, {Laura A.} and {Al Snih al snih}, Soham and Kenneth Ottenbacher and Kyriakos Markides",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1177/0898264311421961",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "1189--1217",
journal = "Journal of Aging and Health",
issn = "0898-2643",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The protective effect of neighborhood composition on increasing frailty among older Mexican Americans

T2 - A barrio advantage?

AU - Aranda, María P.

AU - Ray, Laura A.

AU - Al Snih al snih, Soham

AU - Ottenbacher, Kenneth

AU - Markides, Kyriakos

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Objective: Little is known about the nature of the frailty syndrome in older Hispanics who are projected to be the largest minority older population by 2050. The authors examine prospectively the relationship between medical, psychosocial, and neighborhood factors and increasing frailty in a community-dwelling sample of Mexican Americans older than 75 years. Method: Based on a modified version of the Cardiovascular Health Study Frailty Index, the authors examine 2-year follow-up data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE) to ascertain the rates and determinants of increasing frailty among 2,069 Mexican American adults 75+ years of age at baseline. Results: Respondents at risk of increasing frailty live in a less ethnically dense Mexican-American neighborhood, are older, do not have private insurance or Medicare, have higher levels of medical conditions, have lower levels of cognitive functioning, and report less positive affect. Discussion: Personal as well as neighborhood characteristics confer protective effects on individual health in this representative, well-characterized sample of older Mexican Americans. Potential mechanisms that may be implicated in the protective effect of ethnically homogenous communities are discussed.

AB - Objective: Little is known about the nature of the frailty syndrome in older Hispanics who are projected to be the largest minority older population by 2050. The authors examine prospectively the relationship between medical, psychosocial, and neighborhood factors and increasing frailty in a community-dwelling sample of Mexican Americans older than 75 years. Method: Based on a modified version of the Cardiovascular Health Study Frailty Index, the authors examine 2-year follow-up data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE) to ascertain the rates and determinants of increasing frailty among 2,069 Mexican American adults 75+ years of age at baseline. Results: Respondents at risk of increasing frailty live in a less ethnically dense Mexican-American neighborhood, are older, do not have private insurance or Medicare, have higher levels of medical conditions, have lower levels of cognitive functioning, and report less positive affect. Discussion: Personal as well as neighborhood characteristics confer protective effects on individual health in this representative, well-characterized sample of older Mexican Americans. Potential mechanisms that may be implicated in the protective effect of ethnically homogenous communities are discussed.

KW - cognitive

KW - disability

KW - frailty

KW - Mexican Americans

KW - neighborhood context

KW - positive affect

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053210063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053210063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0898264311421961

DO - 10.1177/0898264311421961

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 1189

EP - 1217

JO - Journal of Aging and Health

JF - Journal of Aging and Health

SN - 0898-2643

IS - 7

ER -