The quality of life after major thermal injury in children: An analysis of 12 survivors with ≥ 80% total body, 70% third-degree burns

David Herndon, J. LeMaster, S. Beard, N. Bernstein, S. R. Lewis, T. C. Rutan, J. B. Winkler, M. Cole, D. Bjarnason, Dennis Gore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-one children admitted between December 1981 and May 1985, with greater than 80% total body surface area burn (TBSAB), underwent total excision and grafting of all of their wounds within 72 hours of injury. Twelve survivors (with an average TBSAB of 89%, 82% third degree) were studied in detail describing the length of hospital stay (77 ± 10 days), number of operative procedures (7.8 ± 0.8), total blood loss (12 ± 2 blood volumes), the number of patients who experienced septic episodes (three), the number of patients who required amputation (four), range of motion, degree of scarring, ability to perform daily activities, and psychological adjustment. Physical impairment, according to standard scales, was approximately 60%; however, 50% of the children old enough to be tested were completely independent in activities of daily living. One third of the children had excessive fear, regression, and neurotic and somatic complaints, but all of them showed remarkable energy in adapting to their disabilities. We conclude that the final outcome, for these patients, can only be assessed as they achieve late adolescence and young adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-619
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume26
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1986

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Burns
Survivors
Hot Temperature
Body Surface Area
Quality of Life
Length of Stay
Wounds and Injuries
Aptitude
Operative Surgical Procedures
Activities of Daily Living
Articular Range of Motion
Blood Volume
Amputation
Fear
Cicatrix

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The quality of life after major thermal injury in children : An analysis of 12 survivors with ≥ 80% total body, 70% third-degree burns. / Herndon, David; LeMaster, J.; Beard, S.; Bernstein, N.; Lewis, S. R.; Rutan, T. C.; Winkler, J. B.; Cole, M.; Bjarnason, D.; Gore, Dennis.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 26, No. 7, 1986, p. 609-619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herndon, D, LeMaster, J, Beard, S, Bernstein, N, Lewis, SR, Rutan, TC, Winkler, JB, Cole, M, Bjarnason, D & Gore, D 1986, 'The quality of life after major thermal injury in children: An analysis of 12 survivors with ≥ 80% total body, 70% third-degree burns', Journal of Trauma, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 609-619.
Herndon, David ; LeMaster, J. ; Beard, S. ; Bernstein, N. ; Lewis, S. R. ; Rutan, T. C. ; Winkler, J. B. ; Cole, M. ; Bjarnason, D. ; Gore, Dennis. / The quality of life after major thermal injury in children : An analysis of 12 survivors with ≥ 80% total body, 70% third-degree burns. In: Journal of Trauma. 1986 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 609-619.
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