The relation between borderline personality disorder features and teen dating violence

Tyson R. Reuter, Carla Sharp, Jeffrey Temple, Julia C. Babcock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious social problem with significant physical and emotional consequences. A number of theoretical models have identified several factors associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) among adults, including the role of Axis II features such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, little is known about borderline features and intimate partner violence among adolescents (i.e., TDV). The present study is the first to investigate the relation between TDV and borderline features in adolescents, taking into account important additional correlates of TDV at the cross-sectional level. Method: An ethnically diverse sample of 778 adolescents completed self-report measures of dating violence, borderline features, alcohol use, and exposure to interparental violence. Results: Borderline features made independent contributions to both TDV victimization and perpetration. The association between borderline features and TDV victimization was moderated by gender, and when considering severe violence, gender moderated the relation between borderline features and both TDV victimization and perpetration. Conclusions: Borderline features should be considered in the assessment, prevention, and intervention of TDV and vice versa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-173
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology of Violence
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Borderline Personality Disorder
personality disorder
violence
Crime Victims
victimization
adolescent
Intimate Partner Violence
Social Problems
Interpersonal Relations
Violence
social problem
gender
Self Report
Theoretical Models
Alcohols

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • borderline personality disorder
  • perpetration
  • teen dating violence
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

The relation between borderline personality disorder features and teen dating violence. / Reuter, Tyson R.; Sharp, Carla; Temple, Jeffrey; Babcock, Julia C.

In: Psychology of Violence, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 163-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reuter, Tyson R. ; Sharp, Carla ; Temple, Jeffrey ; Babcock, Julia C. / The relation between borderline personality disorder features and teen dating violence. In: Psychology of Violence. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 163-173.
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