The relationship between paternal characteristics and child psychosocial functioning in a sample of men arrested for domestic violence

Ellen E.H. Johnson, Catherine V. Strauss, Jo Anna M. Elmquist, Meagan J. Brem, Autumn Rae Florimbio, Jeffrey Temple, Emily F. Rothman, Gregory L. Stuart, Ryan C. Shorey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is estimated that upward of 15.5 million children live in homes where they are exposed to physical and psychological intimate partner violence (IPV). Research indicates that IPV can have deleterious effects on children, including a variety of psychosocial problems, although there is much variability in outcomes of children exposed to IPV. Individual characteristics of the parents involved in IPV may be an important predictor of negative psychosocial outcomes for children. The current study expanded upon prior research and examined the simultaneous associations of paternal characteristics, including paternal IPV perpetration, and child psychosocial functioning (i.e., externalizing, internalizing, and attentional problems) among 153 men arrested for domestic violence and court ordered to attend batterer intervention programs. Analyses examined the relations between paternal alcohol and drug use, antisocial personality traits, hostility, posttraumatic stress symptoms, distress tolerance, IPV perpetration, and men's ratings of their child's psychosocial functioning. Results indicated that poor overall child psychosocial functioning was positively related to paternal antisocial personality symptoms and hostility. Subscale analyses revealed that child attentional problems were positively related to paternal hostility. Child externalizing problems were positively associated with paternal antisocial personality symptoms. The implications of these findings for future research and intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-134
Number of pages21
JournalPartner Abuse
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Domestic Violence
domestic violence
violence
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Hostility
personality
personality traits
Research
tolerance
drug use
Intimate Partner Violence
parents
Parents
rating
alcohol
Alcohols
Psychology

Keywords

  • Batterer intervention programs
  • Child functioning
  • Intimate partner violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

Cite this

The relationship between paternal characteristics and child psychosocial functioning in a sample of men arrested for domestic violence. / Johnson, Ellen E.H.; Strauss, Catherine V.; Elmquist, Jo Anna M.; Brem, Meagan J.; Florimbio, Autumn Rae; Temple, Jeffrey; Rothman, Emily F.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Shorey, Ryan C.

In: Partner Abuse, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 114-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, EEH, Strauss, CV, Elmquist, JAM, Brem, MJ, Florimbio, AR, Temple, J, Rothman, EF, Stuart, GL & Shorey, RC 2019, 'The relationship between paternal characteristics and child psychosocial functioning in a sample of men arrested for domestic violence', Partner Abuse, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 114-134. https://doi.org/10.1891/1946-6560.10.1.114
Johnson, Ellen E.H. ; Strauss, Catherine V. ; Elmquist, Jo Anna M. ; Brem, Meagan J. ; Florimbio, Autumn Rae ; Temple, Jeffrey ; Rothman, Emily F. ; Stuart, Gregory L. ; Shorey, Ryan C. / The relationship between paternal characteristics and child psychosocial functioning in a sample of men arrested for domestic violence. In: Partner Abuse. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 114-134.
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