The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study

Christina Andreae, Kristofer Årestedt, Lorraine Evangelista, Anna Strömberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II–IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-417
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Appetite
Observational Studies
Heart Failure
Prospective Studies
Exercise
Metabolic Equivalent
Brain Natriuretic Peptide
Causality
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • heart failure
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medical–Surgical
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure : A prospective observational study. / Andreae, Christina; Årestedt, Kristofer; Evangelista, Lorraine; Strömberg, Anna.

In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 18, No. 5, 01.06.2019, p. 410-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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