The role of chlamydia trachomatis polymorphic membrane proteins in inflammation and sequelae among women with pelvic inflammatory disease

Brandie D. Taylor, Toni Darville, Chun Tan, Patrik M. Bavoil, Roberta B. Ness, Catherine L. Haggerty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) may increase genital tract inflammation and play a role in virulence. Antibody levels for PmpA, PmpD, and PmpI, measured in densitometric units, were assessed among a pilot sample of 40 C. trachomatis-infected women with mild-to-moderate clinical PID. Women who expressed antibodies to PmpA were less likely to achieve pregnancy (40.0 versus 85.7; P = 0.042) and less likely to have a live birth (0.0 versus 80.0; P = 0.005) compared to women who did not express antibody to PmpA. Women who expressed antibodies to PmpI were more likely to have upper genital tract infection (61.5 versus 20.0; P = 0.026). However, seropositivity to PmpI and PmpD did not modify the risk of reproductive sequelae or inflammation. Seropositivity to chlamydial PmpA may represent a biomarker of increased risk of sequelae secondary to infection with C. trachomatis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number989762
JournalInfectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Infectious Diseases

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