The temporal association between substance use and intimate partner violence among women arrested for domestic violence

Gregory L. Stuart, Todd M. Moore, Sara R. Elkins, Timothy J. O'Farrell, Jeffrey Temple, Susan E. Ramsey, Ryan C. Shorey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: There is a paucity of research on the temporal association between substance use and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization, especially among women arrested for domestic violence. The current study examined whether the probability of IPV perpetration and victimization increases following alcohol or drug use relative to days of no use among women arrested for domestic violence. Method: Women arrested for domestic violence and court referred to batterer intervention programs who met criteria for hazardous drinking participated in the current study (N = 105). Women who reported drinking 4 or more drinks on 1 occasion at least once per month for the past 6 months were considered hazardous drinkers. Violence and substance use were assessed with the Timeline Followback Interviews for substance use and IPV. Results: Women were more likely to perpetrate physical violence on a drinking day (OR = 10.58; 95% CI [5.38, 20.79]) and on a heavy drinking day (OR = 12.81; 95% CI [8.10, 33.57]), relative to a nondrinking day. Women were more likely to be victimized by physical violence on a drinking day (OR = 5.22; 95% CI [2.79, 9.77]) and on a heavy drinking day (OR = 6.16; 95% CI [3.25, 11.68]), relative to a nondrinking day. They were more likely to be victims of sexual coercion (OR = 6.06; 95% CI [1.19, 30.80]) on a cocaine use day relative to a nonuse day. Conclusions: Alcohol use was temporally associated with physical violence perpetration and victimization, and cocaine use was temporally associated with sexual coercion victimization, suggesting that substance use should be targeted in batterer intervention programs for women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-690
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

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Domestic Violence
Drinking
Crime Victims
Coercion
Cocaine
Alcohols
Intimate Partner Violence
Substance Use
Violence
Interviews
Victimization
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Physical Abuse
Physical

Keywords

  • alcohol use
  • drug use
  • intimate partner violence
  • substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The temporal association between substance use and intimate partner violence among women arrested for domestic violence. / Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Elkins, Sara R.; O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Temple, Jeffrey; Ramsey, Susan E.; Shorey, Ryan C.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 81, No. 4, 08.2013, p. 681-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stuart, Gregory L. ; Moore, Todd M. ; Elkins, Sara R. ; O'Farrell, Timothy J. ; Temple, Jeffrey ; Ramsey, Susan E. ; Shorey, Ryan C. / The temporal association between substance use and intimate partner violence among women arrested for domestic violence. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 681-690.
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abstract = "Objective: There is a paucity of research on the temporal association between substance use and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization, especially among women arrested for domestic violence. The current study examined whether the probability of IPV perpetration and victimization increases following alcohol or drug use relative to days of no use among women arrested for domestic violence. Method: Women arrested for domestic violence and court referred to batterer intervention programs who met criteria for hazardous drinking participated in the current study (N = 105). Women who reported drinking 4 or more drinks on 1 occasion at least once per month for the past 6 months were considered hazardous drinkers. Violence and substance use were assessed with the Timeline Followback Interviews for substance use and IPV. Results: Women were more likely to perpetrate physical violence on a drinking day (OR = 10.58; 95{\%} CI [5.38, 20.79]) and on a heavy drinking day (OR = 12.81; 95{\%} CI [8.10, 33.57]), relative to a nondrinking day. Women were more likely to be victimized by physical violence on a drinking day (OR = 5.22; 95{\%} CI [2.79, 9.77]) and on a heavy drinking day (OR = 6.16; 95{\%} CI [3.25, 11.68]), relative to a nondrinking day. They were more likely to be victims of sexual coercion (OR = 6.06; 95{\%} CI [1.19, 30.80]) on a cocaine use day relative to a nonuse day. Conclusions: Alcohol use was temporally associated with physical violence perpetration and victimization, and cocaine use was temporally associated with sexual coercion victimization, suggesting that substance use should be targeted in batterer intervention programs for women.",
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