The utility of international shoulder joint replacement registries and databases

a comparative analytic review of two hundred and sixty one thousand, four hundred and eighty four cases

Carlos Eduardo Afanador Bayona, Jeremy Somerson, Frederick A. Matsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: National registries are valuable tools for understanding the results of shoulder arthroplasty across populations. These databases provide an unselected view of shoulder joint replacement within geographical areas that cannot be obtained from case series or prospective studies. They can be particularly helpful in determining which diagnoses, patients, procedures, and prostheses have higher than expected rates of revision. In an attempt to determine the generalizability of registry data, we asked, ‘how similar are the patients and procedures among the different national registries?’ Methods: We analyzed national shoulder arthroplasty registries and databases accessed via Internet portals and through a PubMed literature search. Results: Seven national/regional registries and five publications regarding national shoulder arthroplasty data were identified; these sources contained a combined total of 261,484 shoulder arthroplasty cases. The percentages of hemiarthroplasty, anatomic (aTSA) and reverse total shoulders (rTSA), the diagnoses leading to arthroplasty, the mean patient age, and the distribution of patient gender varied significantly among these different databases. Conclusion: This study indicates that the indications for and application of shoulder arthroplasty have important geographical variations and that these variations must be considered when comparing outcomes of shoulder arthroplasty from different locations. Without controlling for age, gender, diagnosis and procedure type, the results from one national registry may not be applicable to patients from a different location. In that national data provide the opportunity to reduce costs by identifying implants and procedures with higher failure rates, the funding of registries needs to be free of conflicts of interest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Orthopaedics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 30 2017

Fingerprint

Replacement Arthroplasties
Shoulder Joint
Arthroplasty
Registries
Databases
Hemiarthroplasty
Conflict of Interest
Age Distribution
PubMed
Internet
Prostheses and Implants
Publications
Prospective Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Databases
  • National data
  • National differences
  • Registries
  • Shoulder arthroplasty
  • Shoulder replacement prostheses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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title = "The utility of international shoulder joint replacement registries and databases: a comparative analytic review of two hundred and sixty one thousand, four hundred and eighty four cases",
abstract = "Purpose: National registries are valuable tools for understanding the results of shoulder arthroplasty across populations. These databases provide an unselected view of shoulder joint replacement within geographical areas that cannot be obtained from case series or prospective studies. They can be particularly helpful in determining which diagnoses, patients, procedures, and prostheses have higher than expected rates of revision. In an attempt to determine the generalizability of registry data, we asked, ‘how similar are the patients and procedures among the different national registries?’ Methods: We analyzed national shoulder arthroplasty registries and databases accessed via Internet portals and through a PubMed literature search. Results: Seven national/regional registries and five publications regarding national shoulder arthroplasty data were identified; these sources contained a combined total of 261,484 shoulder arthroplasty cases. The percentages of hemiarthroplasty, anatomic (aTSA) and reverse total shoulders (rTSA), the diagnoses leading to arthroplasty, the mean patient age, and the distribution of patient gender varied significantly among these different databases. Conclusion: This study indicates that the indications for and application of shoulder arthroplasty have important geographical variations and that these variations must be considered when comparing outcomes of shoulder arthroplasty from different locations. Without controlling for age, gender, diagnosis and procedure type, the results from one national registry may not be applicable to patients from a different location. In that national data provide the opportunity to reduce costs by identifying implants and procedures with higher failure rates, the funding of registries needs to be free of conflicts of interest.",
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AU - Matsen, Frederick A.

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N2 - Purpose: National registries are valuable tools for understanding the results of shoulder arthroplasty across populations. These databases provide an unselected view of shoulder joint replacement within geographical areas that cannot be obtained from case series or prospective studies. They can be particularly helpful in determining which diagnoses, patients, procedures, and prostheses have higher than expected rates of revision. In an attempt to determine the generalizability of registry data, we asked, ‘how similar are the patients and procedures among the different national registries?’ Methods: We analyzed national shoulder arthroplasty registries and databases accessed via Internet portals and through a PubMed literature search. Results: Seven national/regional registries and five publications regarding national shoulder arthroplasty data were identified; these sources contained a combined total of 261,484 shoulder arthroplasty cases. The percentages of hemiarthroplasty, anatomic (aTSA) and reverse total shoulders (rTSA), the diagnoses leading to arthroplasty, the mean patient age, and the distribution of patient gender varied significantly among these different databases. Conclusion: This study indicates that the indications for and application of shoulder arthroplasty have important geographical variations and that these variations must be considered when comparing outcomes of shoulder arthroplasty from different locations. Without controlling for age, gender, diagnosis and procedure type, the results from one national registry may not be applicable to patients from a different location. In that national data provide the opportunity to reduce costs by identifying implants and procedures with higher failure rates, the funding of registries needs to be free of conflicts of interest.

AB - Purpose: National registries are valuable tools for understanding the results of shoulder arthroplasty across populations. These databases provide an unselected view of shoulder joint replacement within geographical areas that cannot be obtained from case series or prospective studies. They can be particularly helpful in determining which diagnoses, patients, procedures, and prostheses have higher than expected rates of revision. In an attempt to determine the generalizability of registry data, we asked, ‘how similar are the patients and procedures among the different national registries?’ Methods: We analyzed national shoulder arthroplasty registries and databases accessed via Internet portals and through a PubMed literature search. Results: Seven national/regional registries and five publications regarding national shoulder arthroplasty data were identified; these sources contained a combined total of 261,484 shoulder arthroplasty cases. The percentages of hemiarthroplasty, anatomic (aTSA) and reverse total shoulders (rTSA), the diagnoses leading to arthroplasty, the mean patient age, and the distribution of patient gender varied significantly among these different databases. Conclusion: This study indicates that the indications for and application of shoulder arthroplasty have important geographical variations and that these variations must be considered when comparing outcomes of shoulder arthroplasty from different locations. Without controlling for age, gender, diagnosis and procedure type, the results from one national registry may not be applicable to patients from a different location. In that national data provide the opportunity to reduce costs by identifying implants and procedures with higher failure rates, the funding of registries needs to be free of conflicts of interest.

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