Thoracoabdominal shotgun wounds: an evaluation of factors associated with the need for surgical intervention

Matthew M. Carrick, C. Anne Morrison, D. Jacob Alexis, Mark A. Feanny, Hoang Q. Pham, Francis J. Welsh, Michael A. Norman, Bradford G. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Shotgun wound classification systems attempt to predict the need for surgical intervention based on the size of wounds, pellet spread, or distance from the weapon rather than clinical findings. Methods: A 5-year retrospective review of patients sustaining a thoracoabdominal shotgun wound was performed. Factors believed to be associated with the need for surgical intervention were examined using the Fisher exact test or an independent sample t test. Results: Sixty-four patients suffered a thoracoabdominal shotgun wound. Fifty-nine percent required surgical intervention. Factors significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention were a low revised trauma score and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < .05). Distance from attacker, wound patterns, pellet size, and pellet spread were not found to have an association. Conclusions: Clinical indicators of hemorrhage and shock are associated with the need for surgical intervention, whereas pellet spread, pellet size, and distance from the attacker are not. This is a significant departure from traditional classification systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-69
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume198
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Laparotomy
  • Shotgun
  • Thoracotomy
  • Trauma
  • Wounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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