Tinea capitis in the elderly

T. V. Pursley, Sharon Raimer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An 86-year-old, black woman developed progressive scalp pustulation, tenderness and patchy alopecia within 10 days. Her general health had been good except for mild, compensated ischemic heart disease. The only recent medication she had taken was digoxin. There was no history of previous skin disease. She did recall that her grandchild had 'scalp ringworm' six months prior, but this diagnosis was not confirmed. Important physical findings revealed numerous, tender, 3-5 mm, follicular pustules located singly and in small clusters over the entire scalp. There were two boggy plaques studded with pustules on the frontal and occipital areas. Many of the pustules had tiny 'black dots' in their centers. All lesions were painful. Hair loss was evident over the plaque lesions, but the remaining hair pattern appeared normal. Wood's light examination showed no abnormality. The KOH mount demonstrated large spore, endothrix hairs. A gram stain revealed many neutrophils but very rare bacteria. Bacterial culture grew Staphylococcus aureus. The fungal culture grew Trichophyton tonsurans. The patient was treated with orally administered griseofulvin and erythromycin. Local care consisted of saline compresses and drainage of selected lesions. All of the lesions had resolved after four weeks of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220
Number of pages1
JournalInternational Journal of Dermatology
Volume19
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1980

Fingerprint

Tinea Capitis
Scalp
Hair
Griseofulvin
Trichophyton
Tinea
Digoxin
Alopecia
Erythromycin
Spores
Skin Diseases
Myocardial Ischemia
Staphylococcus aureus
Drainage
Neutrophils
Bacteria
Light
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Pursley, T. V., & Raimer, S. (1980). Tinea capitis in the elderly. International Journal of Dermatology, 19(4), 220.

Tinea capitis in the elderly. / Pursley, T. V.; Raimer, Sharon.

In: International Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 1980, p. 220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pursley, TV & Raimer, S 1980, 'Tinea capitis in the elderly', International Journal of Dermatology, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 220.
Pursley, T. V. ; Raimer, Sharon. / Tinea capitis in the elderly. In: International Journal of Dermatology. 1980 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 220.
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