TNFR1 signaling converging on FGF14 controls neuronal hyperactivity and sickness behavior in experimental cerebral malaria

Nolan M. Dvorak, Nadia D. Domingo, Cynthia Tapia, Paul A. Wadsworth, Mate Marosi, Yosef Avchalumov, Chanida Fongsaran, Leandra Koff, Jessica Di Re, Catherine Sampson, Timothy J. Baumgartner, Pingyuan Wang, Paula P. Villarreal, Olivia D. Solomon, Sonja J. Stutz, Aditi, Jacob Porter, Komi Gbedande, Brendan Prideaux, Thomas A. GreenErin H. Seeley, Parimal Samir, Kelley T. Dineley, Gracie Vargas, Jia Zhou, Irma Cisneros, Robin Stephens, Fernanda Laezza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Excess tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperinflammatory experimental cerebral malaria (eCM), including gliosis, increased levels of fibrin(ogen) in the brain, behavioral changes, and mortality. However, the role of TNF in eCM within the brain parenchyma, particularly directly on neurons, remains underdefined. Here, we investigate electrophysiological consequences of eCM on neuronal excitability and cell signaling mechanisms that contribute to observed phenotypes. Methods: The split-luciferase complementation assay (LCA) was used to investigate cell signaling mechanisms downstream of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) that could contribute to changes in neuronal excitability in eCM. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was performed in brain slices from eCM mice to elucidate consequences of infection on CA1 pyramidal neuron excitability and cell signaling mechanisms that contribute to observed phenotypes. Involvement of identified signaling molecules in mediating behavioral changes and sickness behavior observed in eCM were investigated in vivo using genetic silencing. Results: Exploring signaling mechanisms that underlie TNF-induced effects on neuronal excitability, we found that the complex assembly of fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) and the voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel 1.6 (Nav1.6) is increased upon tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) stimulation via Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2). On account of the dependency of hyperinflammatory experimental cerebral malaria (eCM) on TNF, we performed patch-clamp studies in slices from eCM mice and showed that Plasmodium chabaudi infection augments Nav1.6 channel conductance of CA1 pyramidal neurons through the TNFR1–JAK2–FGF14–Nav1.6 signaling network, which leads to hyperexcitability. Hyperexcitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons caused by infection was mitigated via an anti-TNF antibody and genetic silencing of FGF14 in CA1. Furthermore, knockdown of FGF14 in CA1 reduced sickness behavior caused by infection. Conclusions: FGF14 may represent a therapeutic target for mitigating consequences of TNF-mediated neuroinflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number306
JournalJournal of neuroinflammation
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Hippocampus
  • Ion channels
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Neuronal excitability
  • Phosphorylation
  • Synaptic plasticity
  • Therapeutic target

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience
  • Immunology
  • Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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