Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Mediates Hyperalgesia and Is Up-Regulated in Rats With Chronic Pancreatitis

Guang Yin Xu, John Winston, Mohan Shenoy, Huaizhi Yin, Swaroop Pendyala, Pankaj Jay Pasricha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background & Aims: The neurobiologic basis of pancreatic hyperalgesia in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is understood poorly and there is a need to identify novel therapeutic targets. Our aim was to study the role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a key integrator of noxious stimuli, in the pathogenesis of pancreatic pain in a rat model of CP. Methods: CP was induced in rats by intraductal injection of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. TRPV1 currents in pancreas-specific DRG neurons were measured using perforated patch-clamp techniques. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure mRNA expression of TRPV1 in these neurons after laser capture microdissection. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, using TRPV1-specific antibodies, also were performed. Pancreatic hyperalgesia was assessed by rat's nocifensive behavior to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Results: CP was associated with a 4-fold increase in capsaicin-induced current density (P < .02), along with an increase in the proportion of pancreas-specific DRG neurons that responded to capsaicin (52.9% in controls vs 79.0% in CP; P < .05). CP also was associated with a significant increase in TRPV1 expression both at the messenger RNA and protein level in whole thoracic DRGs and pancreas-specific sensory neurons. Systemic administration of the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 markedly reduced both visceral pain behavior and referred somatic hyperalgesia in rats with CP, but not in control animals. Conclusions: TRPV1 up-regulation and sensitization is a specific molecular mechanism contributing to hyperalgesia in CP and represents a useful target for treating pancreatic hyperalgesia caused by inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1282-1292
Number of pages11
JournalGastroenterology
Volume133
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

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Hyperalgesia
Chronic Pancreatitis
Pancreas
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Capsaicin
Neurons
Trinitrobenzenes
Visceral Pain
Laser Capture Microdissection
Messenger RNA
Sulfonic Acids
vanilloid receptor subtype 1
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Sensory Receptor Cells
Electric Stimulation
Reverse Transcription
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Up-Regulation
Thorax
Western Blotting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Mediates Hyperalgesia and Is Up-Regulated in Rats With Chronic Pancreatitis. / Xu, Guang Yin; Winston, John; Shenoy, Mohan; Yin, Huaizhi; Pendyala, Swaroop; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 133, No. 4, 10.2007, p. 1282-1292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xu, Guang Yin ; Winston, John ; Shenoy, Mohan ; Yin, Huaizhi ; Pendyala, Swaroop ; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay. / Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Mediates Hyperalgesia and Is Up-Regulated in Rats With Chronic Pancreatitis. In: Gastroenterology. 2007 ; Vol. 133, No. 4. pp. 1282-1292.
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