Treatment of smoke-induced pulmonary injury with nebulized dimethylsulfoxide

R. Kimura, L. D. Traber, David Herndon, G. D. Neuhaus, D. L. Traber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhalation injury was produced in sheep that were chronically prepared for study. The injury was induced by insufflating them with smoke from burning cotton cloth. One group of animals was treated with the oxygen-free radical scavenger dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and heparin. Another group received heparin treatment alone, and a third was untreated. The drugs were nebulized into the tracheostomy at 4-hr intervals beginning 1 hr after injury. Following the inhalation injury, lung lymph flow and extravascular lung water measured by thermal-dye dilution technique were both increased. These elevations were associated with minor increases in pulmonary artery pressure, and, thus, since the lymph to plasma protein ratio was unchanged, this increased extravascular fluid formation was probably the result of an elevated microvascular permeability. These changes were associated with a reduction in alpha2 macroglobulin antiprotease activity. The treated groups showed much smaller responses to the inhalation insult. This was especially true in the animals that received the DMSO. These findings support the concept that oxygen free radicals are responsible for the pulmonary edema associated with inhalation injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-341
Number of pages9
JournalCirculatory Shock
Volume25
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1988

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Lung Injury
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Smoke
Inhalation
Wounds and Injuries
Lymph
Heparin
Reactive Oxygen Species
Dye Dilution Technique
Extravascular Lung Water
alpha-Macroglobulins
Therapeutics
Free Radical Scavengers
Tracheostomy
Capillary Permeability
Pulmonary Edema
Protease Inhibitors
Pulmonary Artery
Free Radicals
Blood Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Kimura, R., Traber, L. D., Herndon, D., Neuhaus, G. D., & Traber, D. L. (1988). Treatment of smoke-induced pulmonary injury with nebulized dimethylsulfoxide. Circulatory Shock, 25(4), 333-341.

Treatment of smoke-induced pulmonary injury with nebulized dimethylsulfoxide. / Kimura, R.; Traber, L. D.; Herndon, David; Neuhaus, G. D.; Traber, D. L.

In: Circulatory Shock, Vol. 25, No. 4, 1988, p. 333-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kimura, R, Traber, LD, Herndon, D, Neuhaus, GD & Traber, DL 1988, 'Treatment of smoke-induced pulmonary injury with nebulized dimethylsulfoxide', Circulatory Shock, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 333-341.
Kimura R, Traber LD, Herndon D, Neuhaus GD, Traber DL. Treatment of smoke-induced pulmonary injury with nebulized dimethylsulfoxide. Circulatory Shock. 1988;25(4):333-341.
Kimura, R. ; Traber, L. D. ; Herndon, David ; Neuhaus, G. D. ; Traber, D. L. / Treatment of smoke-induced pulmonary injury with nebulized dimethylsulfoxide. In: Circulatory Shock. 1988 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 333-341.
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