Troubleshooting Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer Surgery

Ted A. James, Alex R. Coffman, Anees B. Chagpar, Judy C. Boughey, Vicki Klimberg, Monica Morrow, Armando E. Giuliano, Seth P. Harlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Performing a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is the standard of care for axillary nodal staging in patients with invasive breast cancer and clinically negative nodes. The procedure provides valuable staging information with few complications when performed by experienced surgeons. However, variation in proficiency exists for this procedure, and a great amount of experience is required to master the technique, especially when faced with challenging cases. The purpose of this paper was to provide a troubleshooting guide for commonly encountered technical difficulties in SLNB, and offer potential solutions so that surgeons can improve their own technical performance from the collective knowledge of experienced specialists in the field. Methods: Information was obtained from a convenience sample of six experienced breast cancer specialists, each actively involved in training surgeons and residents/fellows in SLNB. Each surgeon responded to a structured interview in order to provide salient points of the SLNB procedure. Results: Four of the key opinion surgical specialists provided their perspective using technetium-99 m sulfur colloid, and two shared their experience using blue dye only. Distinct categories of commonly encountered problem scenarios were presented and agreed upon by the panel of surgeons. The responses to each of these scenarios were collected and organized into a troubleshooting guide. Discussion: We present a compilation of ‘tips’ organized as a troubleshooting guide to be used to guide surgeons of varying levels of experience when encountering technical difficulties with SLNB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3459-3466
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
Breast Neoplasms
Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid
Technetium
Standard of Care
Surgeons
Coloring Agents
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

James, T. A., Coffman, A. R., Chagpar, A. B., Boughey, J. C., Klimberg, V., Morrow, M., ... Harlow, S. P. (2016). Troubleshooting Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer Surgery. Annals of Surgical Oncology, 23(11), 3459-3466. https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-016-5432-8

Troubleshooting Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer Surgery. / James, Ted A.; Coffman, Alex R.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Boughey, Judy C.; Klimberg, Vicki; Morrow, Monica; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harlow, Seth P.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 23, No. 11, 01.10.2016, p. 3459-3466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

James, TA, Coffman, AR, Chagpar, AB, Boughey, JC, Klimberg, V, Morrow, M, Giuliano, AE & Harlow, SP 2016, 'Troubleshooting Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer Surgery', Annals of Surgical Oncology, vol. 23, no. 11, pp. 3459-3466. https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-016-5432-8
James, Ted A. ; Coffman, Alex R. ; Chagpar, Anees B. ; Boughey, Judy C. ; Klimberg, Vicki ; Morrow, Monica ; Giuliano, Armando E. ; Harlow, Seth P. / Troubleshooting Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer Surgery. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 11. pp. 3459-3466.
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