Understanding the Relationship Between Relative Group Size and Hate Crime Rates: Linking Methods with Concepts

Sylwia J. Piatkowska, Steven F. Messner, Tse Chuan Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent studies, Hipp et al. caution that the selection of the appropriate denominator in computing the rate of intra- and inter-group interactions is consequential for key findings. The present study builds on this work and examines whether adjusting for the structural opportunities for any type of interaction affects the observed relationship between hate crime rates and minority group size. We go beyond prior research by computing distinctive measures of anti-Black hate crime rates across US counties circa 2000. Our findings offer support for the power-differential hypothesis, revealing a negative effect of minority population size on crime motivated by bias. These results also underline the importance of the procedure developed by Hipp et al., showing that that the selection of the “baseline” for the computation of hate crime rates is critical for understanding the relationship between minority group size and crime motivated by bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1072-1095
Number of pages24
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anti-black hate crimes
  • group threat theory
  • power-differential hypothesis
  • spatial analyses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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