Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies

G. C. Mills, F. C. Schmalstieg, R. M. Goldblum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathways for the degradation of purine deoxynucleotides are similar to those for the ribonucleotides and in many cases utilize the same degradative enzymes. In one case, however, enzyme specificity causes a major difference in these pathways. In contrast to purine 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which act equally well on the ribose or deoxyribose compounds, adenylate deaminase appears to act only on AMP and not on dAMP. Consequently, deoxyadenosine is an obligatory intermediate in the conversion of dAMP to deoxyinosine and ultimately to uric acid. The intermediates of these degradative pathways that we have found in human urine are: adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and deoxyadenosine. Other workers have found inosine, guanosine, deoxyinosine, and deoxyguanosine in urine of children with purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency,2 so small amounts of the latter three compounds are probably also found in normal urine. The appearance of most of these compounds in normal urine probably reflects the presence of small amounts of these compounds in plasma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-77
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
VolumeVOL. 451
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase
Purine Nucleosides
Inosine
AMP Deaminase
Urine
Deoxyribose
Ribonucleotides
Deoxyguanosine
Hypoxanthine
Adenosine Deaminase
Xanthine
Ribose
Guanosine
Enzymes
Adenosine Monophosphate
Uric Acid
Adenosine
Plasmas
Degradation
2'-deoxyadenosine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Mills, G. C., Schmalstieg, F. C., & Goldblum, R. M. (1985). Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, VOL. 451, 66-77.

Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies. / Mills, G. C.; Schmalstieg, F. C.; Goldblum, R. M.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. VOL. 451, 1985, p. 66-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mills, GC, Schmalstieg, FC & Goldblum, RM 1985, 'Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. VOL. 451, pp. 66-77.
Mills, G. C. ; Schmalstieg, F. C. ; Goldblum, R. M. / Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1985 ; Vol. VOL. 451. pp. 66-77.
@article{a4761b183d9345039714cf5dab082216,
title = "Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies",
abstract = "The pathways for the degradation of purine deoxynucleotides are similar to those for the ribonucleotides and in many cases utilize the same degradative enzymes. In one case, however, enzyme specificity causes a major difference in these pathways. In contrast to purine 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which act equally well on the ribose or deoxyribose compounds, adenylate deaminase appears to act only on AMP and not on dAMP. Consequently, deoxyadenosine is an obligatory intermediate in the conversion of dAMP to deoxyinosine and ultimately to uric acid. The intermediates of these degradative pathways that we have found in human urine are: adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and deoxyadenosine. Other workers have found inosine, guanosine, deoxyinosine, and deoxyguanosine in urine of children with purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency,2 so small amounts of the latter three compounds are probably also found in normal urine. The appearance of most of these compounds in normal urine probably reflects the presence of small amounts of these compounds in plasma.",
author = "Mills, {G. C.} and Schmalstieg, {F. C.} and Goldblum, {R. M.}",
year = "1985",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "VOL. 451",
pages = "66--77",
journal = "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences",
issn = "0077-8923",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urinary purines and nucleosides in immune deficiencies

AU - Mills, G. C.

AU - Schmalstieg, F. C.

AU - Goldblum, R. M.

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - The pathways for the degradation of purine deoxynucleotides are similar to those for the ribonucleotides and in many cases utilize the same degradative enzymes. In one case, however, enzyme specificity causes a major difference in these pathways. In contrast to purine 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which act equally well on the ribose or deoxyribose compounds, adenylate deaminase appears to act only on AMP and not on dAMP. Consequently, deoxyadenosine is an obligatory intermediate in the conversion of dAMP to deoxyinosine and ultimately to uric acid. The intermediates of these degradative pathways that we have found in human urine are: adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and deoxyadenosine. Other workers have found inosine, guanosine, deoxyinosine, and deoxyguanosine in urine of children with purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency,2 so small amounts of the latter three compounds are probably also found in normal urine. The appearance of most of these compounds in normal urine probably reflects the presence of small amounts of these compounds in plasma.

AB - The pathways for the degradation of purine deoxynucleotides are similar to those for the ribonucleotides and in many cases utilize the same degradative enzymes. In one case, however, enzyme specificity causes a major difference in these pathways. In contrast to purine 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which act equally well on the ribose or deoxyribose compounds, adenylate deaminase appears to act only on AMP and not on dAMP. Consequently, deoxyadenosine is an obligatory intermediate in the conversion of dAMP to deoxyinosine and ultimately to uric acid. The intermediates of these degradative pathways that we have found in human urine are: adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and deoxyadenosine. Other workers have found inosine, guanosine, deoxyinosine, and deoxyguanosine in urine of children with purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency,2 so small amounts of the latter three compounds are probably also found in normal urine. The appearance of most of these compounds in normal urine probably reflects the presence of small amounts of these compounds in plasma.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022272771&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022272771&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3865574

AN - SCOPUS:0022272771

VL - VOL. 451

SP - 66

EP - 77

JO - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

SN - 0077-8923

ER -