U.S. Responses to Japanese wartime inhuman experimentation after world war ii: National security and wartime exigency

Howard Brody, Sarah E. Leonard, Jing Bao Nie, Paul Weindling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1945-46, representatives of the U.S. government made similar discoveries in both Germany and Japan, unearthing evidence of unethical experiments on human beings that could be viewed as war crimes. The outcomes in the two defeated nations, however, were strikingly different. In Germany, the United States, influenced by the Canadian physician John Thompson, played a key role in bringing Nazi physicians to trial and publicizing their misdeeds. In Japan, the United States played an equally key role in concealing information about the biological warfare experiments and in securing immunity from prosecution for the perpetrators. The greater force of appeals to national security and wartime exigency help to explain these different outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-230
Number of pages11
JournalCambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Security Measures
national security
World War
Germany
War Crimes
Japan
Biological Warfare
physician
National Socialism
Physicians
war crime
experiment
immunity
prosecution
warfare
Immunity
appeal
human being
evidence
Warfare

Keywords

  • biological warfare
  • Germany
  • human research
  • informed consent
  • Japan
  • national security
  • war crimes
  • World War II

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects

Cite this

U.S. Responses to Japanese wartime inhuman experimentation after world war ii : National security and wartime exigency. / Brody, Howard; Leonard, Sarah E.; Nie, Jing Bao; Weindling, Paul.

In: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Vol. 23, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 220-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brody, Howard ; Leonard, Sarah E. ; Nie, Jing Bao ; Weindling, Paul. / U.S. Responses to Japanese wartime inhuman experimentation after world war ii : National security and wartime exigency. In: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 220-230.
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