Use of active video games with or without videoconferencing on health outcomes in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors: a systematic review

Ursela Christopherson, Stephanie J. Wells, Nathan Parker, Elizabeth J. Lyons, Michael D. Swartz, Anna Blozinski, Karen Basen-Engquist, Susan Peterson, Maria C. Swartz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors experience greater functional deficits compared to non-cancer peers or older survivors with a similar diagnosis. Physical activity (PA) is a key strategy for mitigating functional decline, and motivation and peer support are critical PA facilitators in AYA cancer survivors. Active video games (AVGs) may be a “gateway” method to promote PA. Further, integrating AVGs into group videoconferencing, a medium used by AYAs to socialize, can capitalize on peer support needed for PA motivation. Thus, we examined the use of AVGs and/or videoconferencing in PA interventions that included AYA survivors and the effect on physical function and health outcomes. Methods: Seven electronic databases were searched from incept to January 2020. Search terms included videoconferencing, video games, exercise, and cancer. The protocol is registered on PROSPERO: CRD42020163491. Two reviewers evaluated eligibility and methodological quality using Cochrane’s risk of bias tools. Results: Six unique studies were included with 97% reviewer agreement. All used AVGs, none used videoconferencing alone, and one used both. Study designs and outcome measures were heterogeneous. Only one study solely targeted AYA survivors. Most were low to medium quality. Few showed significant improvements in quality of life (QOL) and fatigue (n=3), coordination/balance (n=2), and aerobic capacity (n=1). Conclusions: PA interventions using AVGs and/or videoconferencing may improve QOL and fatigue, but evidence on function is lacking. Rigorous interventions targeting AYA survivors are needed. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Using AVGs and/or videoconferencing to facilitate PA may improve QOL and fatigue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Active video games
  • Adolescent and young adult
  • Cancer
  • Physical function
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

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