Use of bioelectrical impedance analysis measurements in the clinical management of critical illness

Danny O. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

I review the utility of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for assessing changes in body composition and content and distribution of body water in critically ill patients. Published studies suggest that resistance measurements provide a reasonable estimate of total body water but that the precision of the measurements is poor. Presently, BIA does not appear to be a useful clinical technique for measuring changes in body composition. Despite the limitations of current technology, the utility and efficacy of BIA merit evaluation in large, longitudinal studies if our understanding of the meaning of changes in the electrical properties of the body is to improve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume64
Issue number3 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Sep 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

bioelectrical impedance
Electric Impedance
Critical Illness
Body Water
Body Composition
body water
body composition
electrical properties
longitudinal studies
Longitudinal Studies
Technology
methodology

Keywords

  • Bioelectrical impedance
  • body composition
  • body water
  • critical illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Use of bioelectrical impedance analysis measurements in the clinical management of critical illness. / Jacobs, Danny O.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 64, No. 3 SUPPL., 09.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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