Use of kidneys from hepatitis C seropositive donors shortens waitlist time but does not alter one-yr outcome

Kenneth J. Woodside, Kanae Ishihara, James E. Theisen, Marilyn G. Early, Lesa G. Covert, Glenn C. Hunter, Kristene Gugliuzza, John A. Daller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Utilization of hepatitis C seropositive kidney donors remains controversial. We examined the use of hepatitis C seropositive donors for renal transplantation. Data for creatinine, liver function tests, cold ischemia time, and graft and patient survival were analyzed from 20 hepatitis C seropositive recipients receiving cadaveric renal allografts from seropositive donors and were compared with 20 hepatitis C seropositive recipients receiving allografts from seronegative donors. Recipients receiving a kidney from a hepatitis C seropositive donor were on the waitlist for 9.9 ± 1.8 months, compared with 17.8 ± 3.3 months for those receiving a kidney from a seronegative donor (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in graft or patient survival. Incidences of acute cellular rejection and acute tubular necrosis were similar. There were no significant differences in creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, or bilirubin values. While there was a significant difference in aspartate aminotransferase at 2 wk and 6 months, these differences were of questionable clinical importance. In conclusion, donor seropositivity for hepatitis C should not preclude renal transplantation into a hepatitis C seropositive recipient and utilization of these organs decreases waitlist time for hepatitis C seropositive recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-437
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Tissue Donors
Kidney
Kidney Transplantation
Allografts
Creatinine
Cold Ischemia
Liver Function Tests
Graft Survival
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Alanine Transaminase
Bilirubin
Alkaline Phosphatase
Necrosis
Transplants
Survival
Incidence

Keywords

  • Donor selection
  • Graft survival
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver function
  • Marginal organ donors
  • Patient survival
  • Renal transplantation
  • Waitlist time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Woodside, K. J., Ishihara, K., Theisen, J. E., Early, M. G., Covert, L. G., Hunter, G. C., ... Daller, J. A. (2003). Use of kidneys from hepatitis C seropositive donors shortens waitlist time but does not alter one-yr outcome. Clinical Transplantation, 17(5), 433-437. https://doi.org/10.1034/j.1399-0012.2003.00067.x

Use of kidneys from hepatitis C seropositive donors shortens waitlist time but does not alter one-yr outcome. / Woodside, Kenneth J.; Ishihara, Kanae; Theisen, James E.; Early, Marilyn G.; Covert, Lesa G.; Hunter, Glenn C.; Gugliuzza, Kristene; Daller, John A.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 17, No. 5, 10.2003, p. 433-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woodside, Kenneth J. ; Ishihara, Kanae ; Theisen, James E. ; Early, Marilyn G. ; Covert, Lesa G. ; Hunter, Glenn C. ; Gugliuzza, Kristene ; Daller, John A. / Use of kidneys from hepatitis C seropositive donors shortens waitlist time but does not alter one-yr outcome. In: Clinical Transplantation. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 433-437.
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