Use of medication data to validate an association in community-based symptom prevalence studies

H. H. Dayal, Y. H. Li, V. Dayal, C. K. Mittal, W. Snodgrass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A chemical spill from an oil refinery in Texas City, Texas, exposed the community to more than 40 000 lbs (18 144 kg) of highly toxic and corrosive hydrofluoric acid. A symptom prevalence study indicated an association between symptom reports, most notably breathing symptoms, and hydrofluoric acid exposure. Although verification of self-reported symptoms by checking medical records or performing clinical tests is theoretically possible, it is not a feasible alternative in dealing with an entire community. Open-ended data on medication use collected in the prevalence study were coded by organ system and analyzed by cross-classification techniques and log linear models. Results showed that the reported use of medication for hydrofluoric acid- related problems was associated with the exposure; medication use for problems unrelated to hydrofluoric acid exposure was uniform across the exposure categories. Moreover, medication use was significantly associated with the severity of breathing-related problems for each exposure category. Medication use, however, may have been under-reported because it seems difficult to conjure up the names of medications that were not taken or medications not taken recently may not be recalled. Nonetheless, open-ended medication data may be a useful surrogate approach to validating an association between an exposure and health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-97
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Environmental Health
Volume49
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994

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Hydrofluoric Acid
hydrofluoric acid
Cross-Sectional Studies
Respiration
Petroleum Pollution
Caustics
Poisons
Hazardous materials spills
Names
Medical Records
Linear Models
Oils
Health
exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Dayal, H. H., Li, Y. H., Dayal, V., Mittal, C. K., & Snodgrass, W. (1994). Use of medication data to validate an association in community-based symptom prevalence studies. Archives of Environmental Health, 49(2), 93-97.

Use of medication data to validate an association in community-based symptom prevalence studies. / Dayal, H. H.; Li, Y. H.; Dayal, V.; Mittal, C. K.; Snodgrass, W.

In: Archives of Environmental Health, Vol. 49, No. 2, 1994, p. 93-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dayal, HH, Li, YH, Dayal, V, Mittal, CK & Snodgrass, W 1994, 'Use of medication data to validate an association in community-based symptom prevalence studies', Archives of Environmental Health, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 93-97.
Dayal, H. H. ; Li, Y. H. ; Dayal, V. ; Mittal, C. K. ; Snodgrass, W. / Use of medication data to validate an association in community-based symptom prevalence studies. In: Archives of Environmental Health. 1994 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 93-97.
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