Using an IADL assessment to identify older adults who need a behind-the-wheel driving evaluation

Anne Dickerson, Timothy Reistetter, Leonard Trujillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Occupational therapists need to routinely assess driving ability in hospital and/or rehabilitation settings. The purpose of this study is to determine if the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), an observational tool of instrumental activities of daily living, could discriminate between older adult drivers who pass, pass with restrictions, or fail a behind-the-wheel (BTW) evaluation. Forty-six participants were evaluated with a BTW driving assessment and the AMPS. Two one-way ANOVAs found significant differences for both the motor and process scores suggesting the AMPS can be used as a screening tool for driving. Results also showed no significant difference in age between those participants who passed, failed, or needed restrictions supporting the concept that driving abilities are related more to function, not age. Exploration of minimum scores is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)494-506
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Motor Skills
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Aptitude
Activities of Daily Living
Analysis of Variance
Rehabilitation

Keywords

  • AMPS
  • behind-the-wheel (BTW)
  • driving evaluation
  • IADL

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology

Cite this

Using an IADL assessment to identify older adults who need a behind-the-wheel driving evaluation. / Dickerson, Anne; Reistetter, Timothy; Trujillo, Leonard.

In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 29, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 494-506.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dickerson, Anne ; Reistetter, Timothy ; Trujillo, Leonard. / Using an IADL assessment to identify older adults who need a behind-the-wheel driving evaluation. In: Journal of Applied Gerontology. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 494-506.
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