Utility of acellular allograft dermis in the care of elderly burn patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Because skin thins with advancing age, traditional thickness skin grafts cannot always be obtained in very elderly burn patients without creating a new full-thickness wound at the skin graft donor site. Materials and methods. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, acellular allograft dermis (Alloderm, Life Cell Corp., The Woodlands, TX) and thin autograft (depth 0.005 inches) was used in skin grafting 10 elderly burn patients (age 78 year ± 2, TBSA burn 17% ± 2; mean ± SEM) over a 1-year period. The outcome of patients receiving Alloderm was compared retrospectively to a similar group of 18 elderly patients admitted over the prior year, eight of whom underwent operative wound excision and autografting (depth 0.014 inches) without Alloderm. Results. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in patients treated with Alloderm compared to the total group of elderly in whom selective use of operative debridement and skin grafting was used. Functional outcome was improved in those patients who underwent skin grafting regardless of operative technique. Donor site healing time was significantly reduced with Alloderm (12 days ± 1 versus 18 days ± 2), while graft take was similar to conventional autografting. Unfortunately, 3-month mortality remained poor regardless of operative skin grafting or technique used. Conclusions. This initial experience suggests that use of Alloderm may allow more elderly burn patients to undergo operative wound closure, thus improving functional outcome and reducing hospitalization. Unfortunately, long-term survival for very elderly burn patients remains poor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-41
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

Fingerprint

Acellular Dermis
Allografts
Skin Transplantation
Autologous Transplantation
Transplants
Skin
Length of Stay
Wounds and Injuries
Tissue Donors
Autografts
Debridement
Alloderm
Hospitalization
Survival

Keywords

  • Alloderm
  • Geriatrics
  • Trauma
  • Wound care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Utility of acellular allograft dermis in the care of elderly burn patients. / Gore, Dennis.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 125, No. 1, 01.05.2005, p. 37-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{60b8cd81376a4f80b309aa425577bf2c,
title = "Utility of acellular allograft dermis in the care of elderly burn patients",
abstract = "Background. Because skin thins with advancing age, traditional thickness skin grafts cannot always be obtained in very elderly burn patients without creating a new full-thickness wound at the skin graft donor site. Materials and methods. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, acellular allograft dermis (Alloderm, Life Cell Corp., The Woodlands, TX) and thin autograft (depth 0.005 inches) was used in skin grafting 10 elderly burn patients (age 78 year ± 2, TBSA burn 17{\%} ± 2; mean ± SEM) over a 1-year period. The outcome of patients receiving Alloderm was compared retrospectively to a similar group of 18 elderly patients admitted over the prior year, eight of whom underwent operative wound excision and autografting (depth 0.014 inches) without Alloderm. Results. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in patients treated with Alloderm compared to the total group of elderly in whom selective use of operative debridement and skin grafting was used. Functional outcome was improved in those patients who underwent skin grafting regardless of operative technique. Donor site healing time was significantly reduced with Alloderm (12 days ± 1 versus 18 days ± 2), while graft take was similar to conventional autografting. Unfortunately, 3-month mortality remained poor regardless of operative skin grafting or technique used. Conclusions. This initial experience suggests that use of Alloderm may allow more elderly burn patients to undergo operative wound closure, thus improving functional outcome and reducing hospitalization. Unfortunately, long-term survival for very elderly burn patients remains poor.",
keywords = "Alloderm, Geriatrics, Trauma, Wound care",
author = "Dennis Gore",
year = "2005",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jss.2004.11.032",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "125",
pages = "37--41",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utility of acellular allograft dermis in the care of elderly burn patients

AU - Gore, Dennis

PY - 2005/5/1

Y1 - 2005/5/1

N2 - Background. Because skin thins with advancing age, traditional thickness skin grafts cannot always be obtained in very elderly burn patients without creating a new full-thickness wound at the skin graft donor site. Materials and methods. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, acellular allograft dermis (Alloderm, Life Cell Corp., The Woodlands, TX) and thin autograft (depth 0.005 inches) was used in skin grafting 10 elderly burn patients (age 78 year ± 2, TBSA burn 17% ± 2; mean ± SEM) over a 1-year period. The outcome of patients receiving Alloderm was compared retrospectively to a similar group of 18 elderly patients admitted over the prior year, eight of whom underwent operative wound excision and autografting (depth 0.014 inches) without Alloderm. Results. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in patients treated with Alloderm compared to the total group of elderly in whom selective use of operative debridement and skin grafting was used. Functional outcome was improved in those patients who underwent skin grafting regardless of operative technique. Donor site healing time was significantly reduced with Alloderm (12 days ± 1 versus 18 days ± 2), while graft take was similar to conventional autografting. Unfortunately, 3-month mortality remained poor regardless of operative skin grafting or technique used. Conclusions. This initial experience suggests that use of Alloderm may allow more elderly burn patients to undergo operative wound closure, thus improving functional outcome and reducing hospitalization. Unfortunately, long-term survival for very elderly burn patients remains poor.

AB - Background. Because skin thins with advancing age, traditional thickness skin grafts cannot always be obtained in very elderly burn patients without creating a new full-thickness wound at the skin graft donor site. Materials and methods. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, acellular allograft dermis (Alloderm, Life Cell Corp., The Woodlands, TX) and thin autograft (depth 0.005 inches) was used in skin grafting 10 elderly burn patients (age 78 year ± 2, TBSA burn 17% ± 2; mean ± SEM) over a 1-year period. The outcome of patients receiving Alloderm was compared retrospectively to a similar group of 18 elderly patients admitted over the prior year, eight of whom underwent operative wound excision and autografting (depth 0.014 inches) without Alloderm. Results. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in patients treated with Alloderm compared to the total group of elderly in whom selective use of operative debridement and skin grafting was used. Functional outcome was improved in those patients who underwent skin grafting regardless of operative technique. Donor site healing time was significantly reduced with Alloderm (12 days ± 1 versus 18 days ± 2), while graft take was similar to conventional autografting. Unfortunately, 3-month mortality remained poor regardless of operative skin grafting or technique used. Conclusions. This initial experience suggests that use of Alloderm may allow more elderly burn patients to undergo operative wound closure, thus improving functional outcome and reducing hospitalization. Unfortunately, long-term survival for very elderly burn patients remains poor.

KW - Alloderm

KW - Geriatrics

KW - Trauma

KW - Wound care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17144416845&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17144416845&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jss.2004.11.032

DO - 10.1016/j.jss.2004.11.032

M3 - Article

VL - 125

SP - 37

EP - 41

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

IS - 1

ER -