Utility of the 6-minute walk test following lung transplantation

Leonardo Seoane, Sheny Alex, Claude Pirtle, Maneesh Gupta, David E. Taylor, Vincent G. Valentine, Lee M. Arcement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) has replaced standard cardiopulmonary exercises for the evaluation of lung disease. However, data on the utility and characteristics of the 6-MWT following lung transplant are lacking. This study aimed to determine if 6-MWT distance has a normal distribution at 6 months post-transplant and if lower 6-MWT distance was predictive of all-cause mortality. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 6-MWT data on all patients who were lung transplant recipients at Ochsner Medical Center between 2000 and 2005. Forty-nine lung transplant recipients completed a 6-MWT at 6 months following transplant. Of these 49 patients, 34 had completed both the 6-month and 12-month 6-MWT, and data from these were used to evaluate change in distance walked over time. Results: The mean age was 46 6 16 years, 57% were female, and 69% received a bilateral lung transplant. Normal distribution by Kolmogorov-Smirnov was demonstrated for 6-MWT distance at 6 months (P 5 0.873). Mean distance walked improved from 348 6 15 m to 478 614 m at 12 months (P 5 0.0001). The 6-MWT distance at 6 months was not a predictor of survival (OR 5 1.002). Conclusions: Distance for the 6-MWT followed a normal distribution following lung transplant, and distances walked continued to improve for a year following transplant. Although 6-MWT distances are not a predictor of survival, other components of the test may strengthen the predictive value for morbidity and mortality post-transplant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-230
Number of pages4
JournalOchsner Journal
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Lung Transplantation
Transplants
Normal Distribution
Lung
Walk Test
Survival
Mortality
Lung Diseases
Exercise
Morbidity

Keywords

  • 6-minute walk test
  • Cardiothoracic surgery
  • Lung transplant
  • Pulmonary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Seoane, L., Alex, S., Pirtle, C., Gupta, M., Taylor, D. E., Valentine, V. G., & Arcement, L. M. (2010). Utility of the 6-minute walk test following lung transplantation. Ochsner Journal, 10(4), 227-230.

Utility of the 6-minute walk test following lung transplantation. / Seoane, Leonardo; Alex, Sheny; Pirtle, Claude; Gupta, Maneesh; Taylor, David E.; Valentine, Vincent G.; Arcement, Lee M.

In: Ochsner Journal, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2010, p. 227-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seoane, L, Alex, S, Pirtle, C, Gupta, M, Taylor, DE, Valentine, VG & Arcement, LM 2010, 'Utility of the 6-minute walk test following lung transplantation', Ochsner Journal, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 227-230.
Seoane L, Alex S, Pirtle C, Gupta M, Taylor DE, Valentine VG et al. Utility of the 6-minute walk test following lung transplantation. Ochsner Journal. 2010;10(4):227-230.
Seoane, Leonardo ; Alex, Sheny ; Pirtle, Claude ; Gupta, Maneesh ; Taylor, David E. ; Valentine, Vincent G. ; Arcement, Lee M. / Utility of the 6-minute walk test following lung transplantation. In: Ochsner Journal. 2010 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 227-230.
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abstract = "Background: The 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) has replaced standard cardiopulmonary exercises for the evaluation of lung disease. However, data on the utility and characteristics of the 6-MWT following lung transplant are lacking. This study aimed to determine if 6-MWT distance has a normal distribution at 6 months post-transplant and if lower 6-MWT distance was predictive of all-cause mortality. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 6-MWT data on all patients who were lung transplant recipients at Ochsner Medical Center between 2000 and 2005. Forty-nine lung transplant recipients completed a 6-MWT at 6 months following transplant. Of these 49 patients, 34 had completed both the 6-month and 12-month 6-MWT, and data from these were used to evaluate change in distance walked over time. Results: The mean age was 46 6 16 years, 57{\%} were female, and 69{\%} received a bilateral lung transplant. Normal distribution by Kolmogorov-Smirnov was demonstrated for 6-MWT distance at 6 months (P 5 0.873). Mean distance walked improved from 348 6 15 m to 478 614 m at 12 months (P 5 0.0001). The 6-MWT distance at 6 months was not a predictor of survival (OR 5 1.002). Conclusions: Distance for the 6-MWT followed a normal distribution following lung transplant, and distances walked continued to improve for a year following transplant. Although 6-MWT distances are not a predictor of survival, other components of the test may strengthen the predictive value for morbidity and mortality post-transplant.",
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AU - Valentine, Vincent G.

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