Utilizing perspectives from HIV-infected women, male partners and healthcare providers to design family planning SMS in Kenya: A qualitative study

Karren Lewis, Elizabeth K. Harrington, Daniel Matemo, Alison L. Drake, Keshet Ronen, Gabrielle O'Malley, John Kinuthia, Grace John-Stewart, Jennifer A. Unger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Short message service (SMS) presents an opportunity to expand the reach of care and improve reproductive health outcomes. SMS could increase family planning (FP) use through education, support and demand generation. The purpose of this analysis is to determine the perspectives of potential FP users to inform design of SMS. Methods: We conducted focus group discussions (FGD) with HIV-infected women and in-depth interviews (IDI) with male partners and health care workers (HCW) at urban and rural clinics in Kenya to design SMS content for a randomized controlled trial. Results: Women and men indicated SMS could be used as a tool to discuss FP with their partners, and help decrease misconceptions about FP. Women stated SMS could make them more comfortable discussing sensitive topics with HCWs compared to in-person discussions. However, some women expressed concerns about FP SMS particularly if they used FP covertly or feared partner disapproval of FP use. These findings were common among women who had not disclosed their status. Providers viewed SMS as an important tool for tracking patients and clinical triage in conjunction with routine clinical visits. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that SMS has the potential to facilitate FP education, counselling, and interaction with HCWs around FP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number870
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 21 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Family planning
  • HIV
  • mHealth
  • SMS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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