Vaccine special issues

Yellow fever, rabies and Japanese encephalitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Questions regarding immunization against YF, JE, and rabies arise frequently, and the health care provider must be prepared to assist the traveler in making reasonable decisions based on risk and benefit. Frequently, cost is a factor in the traveler's decision, because the price of vaccines for travel is not controlled in the United States, and often is not covered by insurance. Recommendations made by travel agencies, tour guides, fellow travelers, and friends at the destination often are misguided. The practitioner who offers such vaccines should use available sources of information, such as the CDC Yellow Book [3] and the Traveler's Health web site [29], the WHO International Travel and Health web site [30], and the assortment of high-quality texts that are now available on travel medicine [31-34] to remain up-to-date and informed on how best to counsel and serve the traveler.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)697-716
Number of pages20
JournalClinics in Family Practice
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Japanese Encephalitis
Yellow Fever
Rabies
Vaccines
Travel Medicine
Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Insurance
Health Personnel
Immunization
Decision Making
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vaccine special issues : Yellow fever, rabies and Japanese encephalitis. / McLellan, Susan.

In: Clinics in Family Practice, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 697-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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