Vascular access site complications with the use of closure devices in patients treated with platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors during rescue angioplasty

Fernando Boccalandro, Abid Assali, Kenichi Fujise, Richard W. Smalling, Stefano Sdringola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two different closure devices in patients undergoing rescue percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using IIb/IIIa inhibitors and to compare it with patients undergoing elective PCI. One hundred sixty-two patients undergoing rescue PCI treated with IIb/IIIa inhibitors underwent vascular access site closure (6 Fr Perclose, n = 92, or 6 Fr Angioseal, n = 70). Vascular complications were compared with a sex- and age-matched group (n = 100) of patients undergoing manual compression after sheath removal and a similar group of patients undergoing elective PCI (n = 196). The incidence of access site complications was not significantly different between the three groups undergoing rescue PCI and was not higher than in patient receiving GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors without fibrinolysis (RR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.88-1.01). In patients undergoing rescue PCI and receiving IIb/IIIa inhibitors, closure devices allow early sheath removal and are associated with similar outcomes compared with manual compression and elective PCI regardless of the type of closure device used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-289
Number of pages6
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Keywords

  • Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors
  • Manual compression
  • Rescue angioplasty
  • Vascular closure devices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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