Ventilatory anaerobic thresholds of individuals recovering from traumatic brain injury compared with noninjured controls

William E. Amonette, Kurt A. Mossberg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of this study was to compare the peak aerobic capacities and ventilatory anaerobic thresholds (VAT) of individuals with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) to age- and gender-matched controls. METHODS:: Nineteen participants that previously suffered a mild to moderate TBI and 19 apparently healthy controls volunteered as subjects. Traumatic brain injury and healthy controls were matched for age and gender and were similar in weight and body mass index. Volunteers performed a maximal graded treadmill test to volitional failure where oxygen consumption ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2), carbon dioxide production ((Equation is included in full-text article.)CO2, ventilation ((Equation is included in full-text article.)E, and heart rate were measured continuously. From metabolic and ventilatory data, VAT was measured using a previously described method. VAT and peak exercise responses of participants with a TBI were compared with healthy controls. RESULTS:: The (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.)CO2 at VAT and peak exercise were lower for TBI compared with healthy controls. (Equation is included in full-text article.)E was also lower for TBI at VAT and peak exercise. Heart rate was lower for TBI at VAT; however, TBI had similar heart rate to healthy controls at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS:: The VAT and peak exercise capacities of participants with a TBI were below the metabolic demands of many routine daily activities. The data suggest that therapeutic interventions for individuals with a TBI should include targeted exercise prescriptions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
    Volume28
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 2013

    Fingerprint

    Anaerobic Threshold
    Exercise
    Heart Rate
    Traumatic Brain Injury
    Exercise Test
    Carbon Dioxide
    Oxygen Consumption
    Prescriptions
    Ventilation
    Volunteers
    Body Mass Index

    Keywords

    • exercise prescription
    • exercise tolerance
    • fatigue
    • head injury rehabilitation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Rehabilitation
    • Clinical Neurology
    • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

    Cite this

    Ventilatory anaerobic thresholds of individuals recovering from traumatic brain injury compared with noninjured controls. / Amonette, William E.; Mossberg, Kurt A.

    In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Vol. 28, No. 5, 09.2013.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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