Ventriculostomy-related infections. A positive epidemiologic study

C. G. Mayhall, N. H. Archer, V. A. Lamb, A. C. Spadora, J. W. Baggett, J. D. Ward, R. K. Narayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We conducted a prospective epidemiologic study of ventriculostomy-related infections (ventriculitis or meningitis) in 172 consecutive neurosurgical patients over a two-year period to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of the infections. Ventriculitis or meningitis developed in 19 of 172 patients (11 per cent) undergoing a total of 213 ventriculostomies. When data from all these cases plus five cases of nonventriculostomy-related infection were combined, cerebrospinal-fluid pleocytosis was more significantly associated with the diagnosis of ventriculitis or meningitis (P < 0.0001) than were fever and leukocytosis (P = 0.07). Risk factors for ventriculostomy-related infections included intracerebral hemorrhage with intraventricular hemorrhage (P = 0.027), neurosurgical operations (P = 0.016), intracranial pressure of 20 mm Hg or more (P = 0.019), ventricular catheterization for more than five days (P = 0.017), and irrigation of the system (P = 0.021). Previous ventriculostomy did not increase the risk of infection with subsequent procedures. We conclude that ventriculostomy-related infections may be prevented by maintenance of a closed drainage system and by early removal of the ventricular catheter. If monitoring is required for more than five days, the catheter should be removed and inserted at a different site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-559
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume310
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Ventriculostomy
Epidemiologic Studies
Infection
Meningitis
Leukocytosis
Catheters
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Intracranial Pressure
Catheterization
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Drainage
Fever
Maintenance
Prospective Studies
Hemorrhage
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mayhall, C. G., Archer, N. H., Lamb, V. A., Spadora, A. C., Baggett, J. W., Ward, J. D., & Narayan, R. K. (1984). Ventriculostomy-related infections. A positive epidemiologic study. New England Journal of Medicine, 310(9), 553-559.

Ventriculostomy-related infections. A positive epidemiologic study. / Mayhall, C. G.; Archer, N. H.; Lamb, V. A.; Spadora, A. C.; Baggett, J. W.; Ward, J. D.; Narayan, R. K.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 310, No. 9, 1984, p. 553-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mayhall, CG, Archer, NH, Lamb, VA, Spadora, AC, Baggett, JW, Ward, JD & Narayan, RK 1984, 'Ventriculostomy-related infections. A positive epidemiologic study', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 310, no. 9, pp. 553-559.
Mayhall CG, Archer NH, Lamb VA, Spadora AC, Baggett JW, Ward JD et al. Ventriculostomy-related infections. A positive epidemiologic study. New England Journal of Medicine. 1984;310(9):553-559.
Mayhall, C. G. ; Archer, N. H. ; Lamb, V. A. ; Spadora, A. C. ; Baggett, J. W. ; Ward, J. D. ; Narayan, R. K. / Ventriculostomy-related infections. A positive epidemiologic study. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1984 ; Vol. 310, No. 9. pp. 553-559.
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