Virus and bacteria enhance histamine production in middle ear fluids of children with acute otitis media

Tasnee Chonmaitree, Janak A. Patel, Michael A.Lett Brown, Tatsuo Uchida, Roberto Garofalo, Mary J. Owen, Virgil M. Howie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Histamine levels were measured in 677 middle ear fluid (MEF) samples from 248 children (aged 2 months to 7 years) with acute otitis media (AOM); of these, 116 (47%) had documented viral infection. Histamine content was higher in bacteria-positive than in bacteria-negative MEF samples (P =.007) and higher in samples from patients with viral infection than in those from patients with no viral infection (P =.002). Bacteria and viruses together had an additive effect on histamine content in MEF. Histamine concentration in the initial MEF sample tended to be higher in patients with persistent otitis than in those with good response to treatment (P =.14). Results suggest that viruses, bacteria, or both induce histamine production, which leads to increased inflammation in the middle ear. Antihistaminic drugs may be beneficial. Large, prospective, controlled trials of the effects of antihistamine as an adjunct therapy in bacterial and viral AOM are required before recommendations can be made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1265-1270
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume169
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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