Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in a subset of rats following TNBS-induced colitis

QiQi Zhou, Donald D. Price, Robert M. Caudle, G. Nicholas Verne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms experienced by patients. Visceral hypersensitivity has been shown to be a biological marker in many patients with chronic visceral pain. We have previously shown that IBS patients with visceral hypersensitivity also have evidence of thermal hyperalgesia of the hand/foot. Objective. The objective of the current study was to develop an animal model of chronic visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in rats treated with intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Design. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were treated with either 20 mg/rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS, Sigma Chemical Co.) in 50% ethanol (n = 75), an equivalent volume of 50% ethanol (n = 20) or an equivalent volume of saline (n = 20). The agents were delivered with a 24-gauge catheter inserted into the lumen of the colon. Mechanical and thermal behavioral tests were performed using an automated von Frey and Hargreaves device to evaluate somatic hyperalgesia. Colonic distension was performed using an automated distension device to evaluate visceral pain thresholds. All animals were tested 16 weeks after TNBS treatment following complete resolution of the colitis. Results. At 16 weeks, 24% of the treated rats (18/75 rats) still exhibited evidence of visceral as well as somatic hypersensitivity compared to saline- and ethanol-treated rats. Conclusion. Transient colonic inflammation leads to chronic visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in a subset of rats. These findings are similar to the subset of patients who develop chronic gastrointestinal symptoms following enteric infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalPain
Volume134
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Colitis
Hypersensitivity
Trinitrobenzenes
Visceral Pain
Ethanol
Sulfonic Acids
Hyperalgesia
Chronic Pain
Equipment and Supplies
Pain Threshold
Abdominal Pain
Sprague Dawley Rats
Foot
Colon
Catheters
Animal Models
Hand
Hot Temperature
Biomarkers
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Somatic hypersensitivity
  • TNBS
  • Visceral hypersensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in a subset of rats following TNBS-induced colitis. / Zhou, QiQi; Price, Donald D.; Caudle, Robert M.; Verne, G. Nicholas.

In: Pain, Vol. 134, No. 1-2, 01.2008, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhou, QiQi ; Price, Donald D. ; Caudle, Robert M. ; Verne, G. Nicholas. / Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in a subset of rats following TNBS-induced colitis. In: Pain. 2008 ; Vol. 134, No. 1-2. pp. 9-15.
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