Visualizing Tensions in an Ethnographic Moment: Images and Intersubjectivity

Jerome Crowder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Images function as sources of data and influence our thinking about fieldwork, representation, and intersubjectivity. In this article, I show how both the ethnographic relationships and the working method of photography lead to a more nuanced understanding of a healing event. I systematically analyze 33 photographs made over a 15-minute period during the preparation and application of a poultice (topical cure) in a rural Andean home. The images chronicle the event, revealing my initial reaction and the decisions I made when tripping the shutter. By unpacking the relationship between ethnographer and subject, I reveal the constant negotiation of positions, assumptions, and expectations that make up intersubjectivity. For transparency, I provide thumbnails of all images, including metadata, so that readers may consider alternative interpretations of the images and event.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalMedical Anthropology: Cross Cultural Studies in Health and Illness
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 29 2017

Fingerprint

intersubjectivity
Information Storage and Retrieval
Photography
Negotiating
event
working method
photography
transparency
interpretation
Thinking
Metadata

Keywords

  • Andes
  • ethnomedicine
  • fieldwork ethics
  • metadata
  • photography
  • systematic analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Visualizing Tensions in an Ethnographic Moment : Images and Intersubjectivity. / Crowder, Jerome.

In: Medical Anthropology: Cross Cultural Studies in Health and Illness, 29.05.2017, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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