'Wanting' and 'liking' skin picking: A validation of the skin picking reward scale

Ivar Snorrason, Ragnar P. Olafsson, David Houghton, Douglas W. Woods, Han Joo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is often conceptualized as a behavioral addiction in which aberrant reward processing may play an important role. The current study sought to develop a self-report instrument-the Skin Picking Reward Scale (SPRS)-that measures how strongly skin picking is 'liked' (i.e., the degree of pleasurable feelings while receiving the reward) and 'wanted' (i.e., the degree of the motivation to seek the reward). Methods: We administered the SPRS to individuals who endorsed excessive skin picking in online surveys and examined the scale's factor structure (Studies 1 and 2). We then asked individuals with documented pathological skin picking to complete the SPRS and other relevant questionnaires on two occasions one week apart (Study 3). Results: Exploratory (Study 1; n = 330) and confirmatory (Study 2; n = 144) factor analyses consistently supported a two-factor structure reflecting the 'liking' and 'wanting' constructs. Results from Study 3 (N = 36) indicated that the Wanting and the Liking scales had adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Additionally, consistent with predictions, the Wanting scale, but not the Liking scale, was associated with picking urges the following week, greater cue-reactivity, and more picking-related routines/habits. Discussion: These initial findings suggest that SPRS is a psychometrically sound measure of 'wanting' and 'liking' in pathological skin picking. The SPRS may facilitate research on reward processing anomalies in SPD and serve as a useful clinical instrument (e.g., to identify those at risk for cue-induced relapse).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-262
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Behavioral Addictions
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reward
Skin
Cues
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Statistical Factor Analysis
Habits
Motivation
Emotions
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Behavioral addiction
  • Incentive-sensitization theory
  • Psychometric
  • Reward
  • Skin picking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

'Wanting' and 'liking' skin picking : A validation of the skin picking reward scale. / Snorrason, Ivar; Olafsson, Ragnar P.; Houghton, David; Woods, Douglas W.; Lee, Han Joo.

In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.12.2015, p. 250-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snorrason, Ivar ; Olafsson, Ragnar P. ; Houghton, David ; Woods, Douglas W. ; Lee, Han Joo. / 'Wanting' and 'liking' skin picking : A validation of the skin picking reward scale. In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 250-262.
@article{620fc5984bca43229be56b19486adf67,
title = "'Wanting' and 'liking' skin picking: A validation of the skin picking reward scale",
abstract = "Background and aims: Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is often conceptualized as a behavioral addiction in which aberrant reward processing may play an important role. The current study sought to develop a self-report instrument-the Skin Picking Reward Scale (SPRS)-that measures how strongly skin picking is 'liked' (i.e., the degree of pleasurable feelings while receiving the reward) and 'wanted' (i.e., the degree of the motivation to seek the reward). Methods: We administered the SPRS to individuals who endorsed excessive skin picking in online surveys and examined the scale's factor structure (Studies 1 and 2). We then asked individuals with documented pathological skin picking to complete the SPRS and other relevant questionnaires on two occasions one week apart (Study 3). Results: Exploratory (Study 1; n = 330) and confirmatory (Study 2; n = 144) factor analyses consistently supported a two-factor structure reflecting the 'liking' and 'wanting' constructs. Results from Study 3 (N = 36) indicated that the Wanting and the Liking scales had adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Additionally, consistent with predictions, the Wanting scale, but not the Liking scale, was associated with picking urges the following week, greater cue-reactivity, and more picking-related routines/habits. Discussion: These initial findings suggest that SPRS is a psychometrically sound measure of 'wanting' and 'liking' in pathological skin picking. The SPRS may facilitate research on reward processing anomalies in SPD and serve as a useful clinical instrument (e.g., to identify those at risk for cue-induced relapse).",
keywords = "Behavioral addiction, Incentive-sensitization theory, Psychometric, Reward, Skin picking",
author = "Ivar Snorrason and Olafsson, {Ragnar P.} and David Houghton and Woods, {Douglas W.} and Lee, {Han Joo}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1556/2006.4.2015.033",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "250--262",
journal = "Journal of Behavioral Addictions",
issn = "2062-5871",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Wanting' and 'liking' skin picking

T2 - A validation of the skin picking reward scale

AU - Snorrason, Ivar

AU - Olafsson, Ragnar P.

AU - Houghton, David

AU - Woods, Douglas W.

AU - Lee, Han Joo

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Background and aims: Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is often conceptualized as a behavioral addiction in which aberrant reward processing may play an important role. The current study sought to develop a self-report instrument-the Skin Picking Reward Scale (SPRS)-that measures how strongly skin picking is 'liked' (i.e., the degree of pleasurable feelings while receiving the reward) and 'wanted' (i.e., the degree of the motivation to seek the reward). Methods: We administered the SPRS to individuals who endorsed excessive skin picking in online surveys and examined the scale's factor structure (Studies 1 and 2). We then asked individuals with documented pathological skin picking to complete the SPRS and other relevant questionnaires on two occasions one week apart (Study 3). Results: Exploratory (Study 1; n = 330) and confirmatory (Study 2; n = 144) factor analyses consistently supported a two-factor structure reflecting the 'liking' and 'wanting' constructs. Results from Study 3 (N = 36) indicated that the Wanting and the Liking scales had adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Additionally, consistent with predictions, the Wanting scale, but not the Liking scale, was associated with picking urges the following week, greater cue-reactivity, and more picking-related routines/habits. Discussion: These initial findings suggest that SPRS is a psychometrically sound measure of 'wanting' and 'liking' in pathological skin picking. The SPRS may facilitate research on reward processing anomalies in SPD and serve as a useful clinical instrument (e.g., to identify those at risk for cue-induced relapse).

AB - Background and aims: Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is often conceptualized as a behavioral addiction in which aberrant reward processing may play an important role. The current study sought to develop a self-report instrument-the Skin Picking Reward Scale (SPRS)-that measures how strongly skin picking is 'liked' (i.e., the degree of pleasurable feelings while receiving the reward) and 'wanted' (i.e., the degree of the motivation to seek the reward). Methods: We administered the SPRS to individuals who endorsed excessive skin picking in online surveys and examined the scale's factor structure (Studies 1 and 2). We then asked individuals with documented pathological skin picking to complete the SPRS and other relevant questionnaires on two occasions one week apart (Study 3). Results: Exploratory (Study 1; n = 330) and confirmatory (Study 2; n = 144) factor analyses consistently supported a two-factor structure reflecting the 'liking' and 'wanting' constructs. Results from Study 3 (N = 36) indicated that the Wanting and the Liking scales had adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Additionally, consistent with predictions, the Wanting scale, but not the Liking scale, was associated with picking urges the following week, greater cue-reactivity, and more picking-related routines/habits. Discussion: These initial findings suggest that SPRS is a psychometrically sound measure of 'wanting' and 'liking' in pathological skin picking. The SPRS may facilitate research on reward processing anomalies in SPD and serve as a useful clinical instrument (e.g., to identify those at risk for cue-induced relapse).

KW - Behavioral addiction

KW - Incentive-sensitization theory

KW - Psychometric

KW - Reward

KW - Skin picking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84953746086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84953746086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1556/2006.4.2015.033

DO - 10.1556/2006.4.2015.033

M3 - Article

C2 - 26690620

AN - SCOPUS:84953746086

VL - 4

SP - 250

EP - 262

JO - Journal of Behavioral Addictions

JF - Journal of Behavioral Addictions

SN - 2062-5871

IS - 4

ER -