West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis virus antibody seroconversion, prevalence, and persistence in naturally infected pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina)

Renee R. Hukkanen, H. Denny Liggitt, Stephen T. Kelley, Richard Grant, David M. Anderson, Roy A. Hall, Robert B. Tesh, Amelia P Travassos DaRosa, Helle Bielefeldt-Ohmann

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6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pig-tailed macaques (Macaco nemestrina) naturally infected with West Nile virus were monitored from 1999 to 2005 to determine virus-specific antibody seroconversion, prevalence, and persistence. Antibodies persisted for up to 36 months, as detected by epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent and hemagglutination inhibition assays. Exposure to cocirculating St. Louis encephalitis virus was evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-714
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Hukkanen, R. R., Liggitt, H. D., Kelley, S. T., Grant, R., Anderson, D. M., Hall, R. A., Tesh, R. B., DaRosa, A. P. T., & Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H. (2006). West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis virus antibody seroconversion, prevalence, and persistence in naturally infected pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, 13(6), 711-714. https://doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00031-06