Whole body and skeletal muscle glutamine metabolism in healthy subjects

B. Mittendorfer, Elena Volpi, R. R. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We measured glutamine kinetics using L-[5-15N]glutamine and L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine infusions in healthy subjects in the postabsorptive state and during ingestion of an amino acid mixture that included glutamine, alone or with additional glucose. Ingestion of the amino acid mixture increased arterial glutamine concentrations by ∼20% (not by 30%; P < 0.05), irrespective of the presence or absence of glucose. Muscle free glutamine concentrations remained unchanged during ingestion of amino acids alone but decreased from 21.0 ± 1.0 to 16.4 ± 1.6 mmolfl (P < 0.05) during simultaneous ingestion of glucose due to a decrease in intramuscular release from protein breakdown and glutamine synthesis (0.82 ± 0.10 vs. 0.59 ± 0.06 μmol·100 ml leg-1·min-1; P < 0.05). In both protocols, muscle glutamine inward and outward transport and muscle glutamine utilization for protein synthesis increased during amino acid ingestion; leg glutamine net balance remained unchanged. In summary; ingestion of an amino acid mixture that includes glutamine increases glutamine availability and uptake by skeletal muscle in healthy subjects without causing an increase in the intramuscular free glutamine pool. Simultaneous ingestion of glucose diminishes the intramuscular glutamine concentration despite increased glutamine availability in the blood due to decreased glutamine production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume280
Issue number2 43-2
StatePublished - Feb 2001

Fingerprint

Glutamine
Metabolism
Muscle
Healthy Volunteers
Skeletal Muscle
Eating
Amino Acids
Glucose
Muscles
Leg
Availability
Enzyme kinetics
Phenylalanine
Proteins
Blood

Keywords

  • Amino acid
  • Glucose
  • Protein
  • Stable isotopes
  • Synthesis
  • Transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Whole body and skeletal muscle glutamine metabolism in healthy subjects. / Mittendorfer, B.; Volpi, Elena; Wolfe, R. R.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 280, No. 2 43-2, 02.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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