Widespread detection of antibodies to Eastern Equine Encephalitis, West Nile, St. Louis Encephalitis, and Turlock Viruses in various species of wild birds from across the United States

Kerri Pedersen, David R. Marks, Eryu Wang, Gillian Eastwood, Scott Weaver, Samuel M. Goldstein, David R. Sinnett, Thomas J. De Liberto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wild birds serve as amplifying hosts for many arboviruses, and are thought to be responsible for introducing these viruses into new areas during migration as well as reintroducing them to places where winter temperatures disrupt mosquito-borne transmission. To learn more about four mosquito-borne arboviruses of concern to human or animal health, we tested sera from 997 wild birds of 54 species and 17 families across 44 states of the United States collected from January 1, 2013, through September 30, 2013. Samples were tested for antibody against eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile, and Turlock viruses using plaque reduction neutralization tests with an endpoint of 80% or greater. Of the 333 (33.4%) birds that tested positive for antibody to at least one arbovirus, 29.7% were exposed to two or more arboviruses. Exposure to all four arboviruses was detected in Canada geese, double-crested cormorants, mallards, mute swans, laughing gulls, and American coots. Our results suggest that exposure to arboviruses is widespread in the United States across a diversity of wild bird species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-211
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis
St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses
Arboviruses
Birds
Antibodies
Culicidae
St. Louis Encephalitis
Charadriiformes
Geese
Neutralization Tests
West Nile virus
Canada
Viruses
Temperature
Health
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Widespread detection of antibodies to Eastern Equine Encephalitis, West Nile, St. Louis Encephalitis, and Turlock Viruses in various species of wild birds from across the United States. / Pedersen, Kerri; Marks, David R.; Wang, Eryu; Eastwood, Gillian; Weaver, Scott; Goldstein, Samuel M.; Sinnett, David R.; De Liberto, Thomas J.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 95, No. 1, 01.07.2016, p. 206-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pedersen, Kerri ; Marks, David R. ; Wang, Eryu ; Eastwood, Gillian ; Weaver, Scott ; Goldstein, Samuel M. ; Sinnett, David R. ; De Liberto, Thomas J. / Widespread detection of antibodies to Eastern Equine Encephalitis, West Nile, St. Louis Encephalitis, and Turlock Viruses in various species of wild birds from across the United States. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2016 ; Vol. 95, No. 1. pp. 206-211.
@article{ecf6a1d4b8984e0293bd207517d1b20a,
title = "Widespread detection of antibodies to Eastern Equine Encephalitis, West Nile, St. Louis Encephalitis, and Turlock Viruses in various species of wild birds from across the United States",
abstract = "Wild birds serve as amplifying hosts for many arboviruses, and are thought to be responsible for introducing these viruses into new areas during migration as well as reintroducing them to places where winter temperatures disrupt mosquito-borne transmission. To learn more about four mosquito-borne arboviruses of concern to human or animal health, we tested sera from 997 wild birds of 54 species and 17 families across 44 states of the United States collected from January 1, 2013, through September 30, 2013. Samples were tested for antibody against eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile, and Turlock viruses using plaque reduction neutralization tests with an endpoint of 80{\%} or greater. Of the 333 (33.4{\%}) birds that tested positive for antibody to at least one arbovirus, 29.7{\%} were exposed to two or more arboviruses. Exposure to all four arboviruses was detected in Canada geese, double-crested cormorants, mallards, mute swans, laughing gulls, and American coots. Our results suggest that exposure to arboviruses is widespread in the United States across a diversity of wild bird species.",
author = "Kerri Pedersen and Marks, {David R.} and Eryu Wang and Gillian Eastwood and Scott Weaver and Goldstein, {Samuel M.} and Sinnett, {David R.} and {De Liberto}, {Thomas J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4269/ajtmh.15-0840",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "95",
pages = "206--211",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Widespread detection of antibodies to Eastern Equine Encephalitis, West Nile, St. Louis Encephalitis, and Turlock Viruses in various species of wild birds from across the United States

AU - Pedersen, Kerri

AU - Marks, David R.

AU - Wang, Eryu

AU - Eastwood, Gillian

AU - Weaver, Scott

AU - Goldstein, Samuel M.

AU - Sinnett, David R.

AU - De Liberto, Thomas J.

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - Wild birds serve as amplifying hosts for many arboviruses, and are thought to be responsible for introducing these viruses into new areas during migration as well as reintroducing them to places where winter temperatures disrupt mosquito-borne transmission. To learn more about four mosquito-borne arboviruses of concern to human or animal health, we tested sera from 997 wild birds of 54 species and 17 families across 44 states of the United States collected from January 1, 2013, through September 30, 2013. Samples were tested for antibody against eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile, and Turlock viruses using plaque reduction neutralization tests with an endpoint of 80% or greater. Of the 333 (33.4%) birds that tested positive for antibody to at least one arbovirus, 29.7% were exposed to two or more arboviruses. Exposure to all four arboviruses was detected in Canada geese, double-crested cormorants, mallards, mute swans, laughing gulls, and American coots. Our results suggest that exposure to arboviruses is widespread in the United States across a diversity of wild bird species.

AB - Wild birds serve as amplifying hosts for many arboviruses, and are thought to be responsible for introducing these viruses into new areas during migration as well as reintroducing them to places where winter temperatures disrupt mosquito-borne transmission. To learn more about four mosquito-borne arboviruses of concern to human or animal health, we tested sera from 997 wild birds of 54 species and 17 families across 44 states of the United States collected from January 1, 2013, through September 30, 2013. Samples were tested for antibody against eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile, and Turlock viruses using plaque reduction neutralization tests with an endpoint of 80% or greater. Of the 333 (33.4%) birds that tested positive for antibody to at least one arbovirus, 29.7% were exposed to two or more arboviruses. Exposure to all four arboviruses was detected in Canada geese, double-crested cormorants, mallards, mute swans, laughing gulls, and American coots. Our results suggest that exposure to arboviruses is widespread in the United States across a diversity of wild bird species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84977641249&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84977641249&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4269/ajtmh.15-0840

DO - 10.4269/ajtmh.15-0840

M3 - Article

VL - 95

SP - 206

EP - 211

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 1

ER -