Will pathologists play as important a role in the future as they have in the past against the challenge of infectious diseases

David Walker, J. S. Dumler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the recognition less than 120 years ago that organisms visible only microscopically are capable of causing human diseases, pathologists have played a major role in identifying and characterizing the etiologic infectious agents and in elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms. In face of the opportunities and challenges presented by molecular technology, AIDS and other emerging infections, and the evolution of health care systems, it is worthwhile to question whether the field of pathology will continue in the future to make major contributions in the field of infectious diseases. The AIDS epidemic has awakened pathologists to the need to reemphasize infectious diseases in diagnostic anatomic and clinical pathology, basic and applied research, and medical and scientific education. The knowledge and skills of pathologists are uniquely critical to the achievement of efficient advances in infectious diseases, and will remain so provided that pathologists embrace molecular science and apply it as a principal component in their methodologic and conceptual armamentarium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-170
Number of pages4
JournalInfectious Agents and Disease
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995

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Communicable Diseases
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Clinical Pathology
Medical Education
Pathology
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Pathologists
Infection
Research

Keywords

  • Infectious diseases
  • Molecular science
  • Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

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